baseball

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

75 years ago this week, the women of the All American Girls Professional Baseball League put on their skirts and cleats and trotted out onto four Midwestern ball fields for the first time. Now some of those players are in Rockford to celebrate their history and help push women’s baseball into the future. 

Back in 1943, chewing-gum magnate P.K. Wrigley decided that America needed more baseball to keep spirits up during World War II. Since the "boys" were away fighting, he called on the "girls" to do the patriotic thing and entertain the Home Front. And, boy, did they!

frontierleague.com

Minor league baseball players are suing Major League Baseball, claiming unfair pay. But a new proposal in Illinois would protect independent leagues from a similar lawsuit. 

The state’s minimum wage law applies to most workers, but there are a few exceptions: farm hands, children of small business owners, and outdoor salesmen to name a few.

Susan Stephens

  The International Women’s Baseball Center dedicated its first brick-and-mortar site over the weekend.  

The nonprofit promotes women's baseball and works to preserve its history, and its physical location has particular significance.  It's across the street from Beyer Stadium, former home of the Rockford Peaches.  This World War II era-team was immortalized in the 1992 film “A League of Their Own.” 

Susan Stephens

  Rockford has a long and storied baseball history. Now, an international organization hopes to create a long and storied future for the sport there.

The International Women’s Baseball Center isn’t a place...yet. Right now, it’s a nonprofit that promotes women’s baseball and works to preserve its history. But this Saturday, the organization plants its feet on home plate in Rockford, right across the street from Beyer Stadium.

"14 Ernie Banks Medal of Freedom White House" by White House photographer

The public memorial for Cubs legend Ernie Banks will be held on Wednesday in downtown Chicago. A statue of Banks will stand at Daley Plaza from Wednesday until Saturday.

Banks died Friday from a heart attack at the age of 83. He was a Baseball Hall of Famer, two-time National League MVP, and the first African-American to play for the Cubs, where he spent his entire major league career.

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