Brian Mackey

A national study of state government budgeting gives Illinois low marks.  

It's no surprise to see Illinois fare poorly when it comes to finances.  A two year budget impasse created even more problems.

"It's hard to gauge the success of the budget in Illinois when you didn't have one," said Bill Glasgall with the non-partisan Volcker Alliance, which conducted the analysis titled "Truth And Integrity In State Budgeting: What is The Reality?"

Brian Mackey/NPR Illinois

Illinois could soon begin to tackle its massive pile of unpaid bills, thanks to a move Thursday by Governor Bruce Rauner.

Rauner is moving ahead with a bond issue — borrowing about $6 billion dollars — to pay off various state vendors immediately. The move should save Illinois hundreds of millions of dollars a year in late penalties.

Rauner says he’s going to look for other ways to cut spending in order to pay off the bonds. Democrats, like Rep. Greg Harris from Chicago, say they worry Rauner will target human service providers like he did during the budget stalemate.


The state treasurer says Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner must go to New York to talk bond-rating houses out of knocking the state's creditworthiness into "junk" status.

Democrat Michael Frerichs said in Chicago Monday that the Republican governor should commit to the $36 billion spending plan the General Assembly adopted last week over his vetoes.

It includes a $5 billion income-tax increase. It's the first budget Illinois has had in two years because of political disagreements. Bond houses have threatened to knock Illinois' rating down to "junk" even with the budget deal.

Democratic state senators rejected a push by Republicans to give Governor Bruce Rauner powers that would allow broad spending cuts.  

City of Rockford

Members of Rockford's Finance and Personnel Committee forwarded a budget plan to address a  $5.3 million shortfall to the full city council.