Christine Radogno

Governor Rauner's relentless push for a reduction in unions' power and Democrats' sustained refusal to go along has Illinois set to round out an eleventh month without a budget.

It's under this backdrop that the two parties are also tasked with crafting next fiscal year's budget.

Indications early this week were that it wasn't going well.

House Speaker Michael Madigan said following a meeting with Rauner on Wednesday that the governor and his "agents" were "unpersuasive" in making the case for Rauner's agenda before small "working" groups.

"20110420-RD-LSC-0369" By Flickr User U.S. Department of Agriculture / (CC X 2.0)

Mixed messages came out of a meeting Tuesday between the Illinois governor and legislative leaders. It was their first meeting in months, even as Illinois is in the midst of an unprecedented budget standoff.

Senate President John Cullerton, a Democrat, left the meeting saying he got what he wanted out of it.

"The main thing I wanted to accomplish was to make sure that in the revenue side ... that the governor was committed to being in favor of some revenue increases, and he said he was," Cullerton said.

The results of two high-profile Illinois state races are widely seen as a referendum on Republican Governor Bruce Rauner's agenda. 

But a top Senate Republican says it's important to look at all the races.

Minority Leader Christine Radogno says members of both parties need to "get their act together" and work on a compromise.

"It's about this state facing a crisis and that crisis was there Monday before the election and it's still here on Thursday,” Radogno said.

WUIS

Legislators are trying to protect kids from measles, without offending anti-vaccine parents.

The outbreak of measles at a Palatine learning center in February has lawmakers wanting to protect children, but it's a politically sensitive topic.

When Senate Republican Leader Christine Radogno presented her proposal to a legislative committee, she was upfront about her desire to not step on the toes of parents who choose to not vaccinate their kids, while at the same time wanting to protect children.

Amanda Vinicky / Illinois Public Radio

Members of Illinois' 98th General Assembly were sworn in today in Springfield. There are a number of new faces -- but the four at the top remain the same.