Dennis Hastert

Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert has officially completed his 15-month prison sentence and is no longer being monitored by law enforcement.

Bureau of Prisons records indicate that Wednesday was the end of Hastert's period in federal custody. The Lake County Sheriff's Office says it stopped its electronic monitoring of the 75-year-old Wednesday morning. He now begins two years of probation.

Hastert pleaded guilty to banking violations in a hush-money case that revealed he sexually abused at least four high school students. 

An Illinois judge has refused a request by Dennis Hastert to bar reporters' cameras and recording devices from court in a May lawsuit accusing the ex-House speaker of sexually abusing a boy in a bathroom when he was a fourth-grader in the 1970s.

The accusation wasn't part of a criminal hush-money case against the 75-year-old Republican that sent him to prison for more than a year. That criminal case revealed Hastert abused at least four boys when he coached at Yorkville High School outside Chicago.

Lake County Sheriff's Office

A suburban Chicago sheriff's department says it has fitted Dennis Hastert with the kind of electronic monitoring that's typically used when recent convicts are placed on home confinement.

The Lake County Sheriffs' Office said Wednesday that authorities attached the device Monday shortly after the ex-U.S. House Speaker was released from a federal prison in Minnesota.

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Former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert has been released from prison in Minnesota and transferred to a Chicago re-entry facility.

Hastert is nearing the end of a 15-month sentence that a federal judge gave him in April 2016 in a case that revealed accusations that he had sexually abused teenagers while he coached wrestling at Yorkville High School.

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The man who is suing former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert over an alleged sexual assault more than four decades ago will be able to use a fictitious name, a Kendall County judge ordered on Tuesday.

Judge Robert P. Pilmer granted the motion for the man to proceed using the name "Richard Doe."

According to court documents obtained by WNIJ, the  Plaintiff's filing from May 26 claims "the identification of [the] Plaintiff in court documents would bring significant unwanted publicity to [the] Plaintiff and his family."

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