Dennis Hastert

Associated Press

Former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert will lose his $28,000 annual state pension for his nearly six years of service as a state representative in the Illinois legislature.

The General Assembly Retirement System board of trustees voted 5-2 Wednesday to terminate the pension. Illinois law allows the state to revoke pensions of individuals convicted of felonies connected to their time in the legislature.

Board member Mike Zalewski, a Democratic state representative from Riverside, says Hastert’s financial crimes related to his role as a public official.

Department Of Justice

The U.S. attorney in Chicago who oversaw the prosecution of former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert has resigned.

A prosecutor's spokesman in Chicago says Zachary Fardon submitted his resignation Monday. It comes days after Attorney General Jeff Sessions asked 46 prosecutors who were holdovers from President Barack Obama's administration to step down.

The 50-year-old assumed Chicago's No. 1 federal law enforcement job in 2013.

YouTube

A lawyer for a sexual abuse victim of Dennis Hastert says she'll depose the former U.S. House speaker after he's released from federal custody.

Kristi Browne represents a former Yorkville High School athlete who is suing Hastert for breach of contract in the hush-money pact that led to the Illinois Republican's downfall.

Browne said Wednesday no settlement has been discussed.

YouTube

Imprisoned former House speaker Dennis Hastert wants one of his sexual abuse victims to return the $1.7 million in hush money the Illinois Republican paid him.

A filing in a suburban Chicago county court this week made that request on Hastert's behalf in an ongoing civil case.

The 75-year-old is serving a 15-month sentence in federal prison for violating banking laws as he sought to silence the victim.

"Dennis Hastert 109th pictorial photo" by United States Congress

Former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert is citing a technicality in a bid to restore his tax-covered public school pensions as he serves a 15-month prison sentence in a hush-money case that stemmed from his sexual abuse of high school students.

Hastert's lawyers contend his conviction was for violating banking law between 2010 and 2015 as he sought to pay one victim $3.5 million in hush money not specifically for the sexual abuse. On those grounds, they say his $17,000-a-year teacher's pension can't be revoked. 

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