Dixon is a city of around 16,000 people in Lee County.  It’s best known as the boyhood home of U.S. President Ronald Reagan, and also hosts IDOT’s Region 2 headquarters. 

However, for a city of its size, NIU economics scholar Brian Richard says Dixon’s seen major growth in the manufacturing sector.

“Lee County, Dixon, manufacturing employment is growing over the last five years 37%, 30-40%, whereas statewide it’s closer to five percent." 

This is based on economic date compiled from 2010-2014. 

Dixon Appoints New City Clerk

Sep 28, 2016
city of Dixon

Dixon is restructuring its finance department by appointing a new city clerk. 

The department’s office manager, Becky Fredericks, will take the position, while retaining her key finance and HR duties.  The job shift is expected to save the city around $70,000 each year. Saukvalley.com reports  some managerial duties will return to Finance Director Paula Meyer, while others will be spread among current administrative staff.

Dixon Park District

 The Dixon Park District has new registration rules for its dog park. 

Starting in October, users of Park 4 Paws in Meadows Park will have to register their dogs at the district office and provide up-to-date copies of the pets’ vaccination records. 

It costs $10 for district families to register up to three dogs, and they’ll be given a special lanyard to take into the park.  Saukvalley.com reports the new requirement is meant to bring peace of mind to owners concerned about their pets’ safety.  Violators will be fined $20.  

Lee-Ogle Enterprise Zone Is Approved

Sep 9, 2016

The  Illinois State Enterprise Zone Board recently approved the Lee-Ogle Enterprise Zone.  

The zone provides exemptions to a variety of business taxes, which would then promote economic development in the two counties.  The two counties were ranked sixth among 18 statewide applicants.  They competed for 12 vacant slots.  

Dixon Public Works Director Resigns

Jun 28, 2016
city of Dixon

  Dixon Public Works Director Tim Ridder has resigned.  

He was hired in October to consolidate the city’s various public works departments.  These included water, sewer, cemetery, and public properties. 

Bringing these groups under one roof was part of Dixon’s transition to a city manager form of government.  This transition was designed to avoid individuals isolating themselves within a single department.  These precise conditions allowed former City Comptroller Rita Crundwell to embezzle $53 million from 1983 to 2012.