Education

Education and learning

Carl Nelson / WNIJ

Illinois released its report card for public schools last week. There are still no results from the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers exam – known at the “PARCC” test – on the website.

WNIJ News took a look at how standard high schools rank against others in our listening area.

Carroll County has the highest average secondary-school graduation rate of 93 percent, while Winnebago County has the lowest with 76 percent.

Higher Ed Focus Of Illinois Legislative Meeting

Nov 9, 2015
State of Illinois

Illinois legislators will return to Springfield Tuesday ... with no prospect of finalizing a budget for the state. 

So what will they do during the one-day session?

Steve Brown, state House Speaker Michael Madigan’s spokesman, says the plight of Illinois universities and community colleges will be in the spotlight during that meeting.

WUIS

VICE News published an investigation of American universities with ties to the military, police, and intelligence communities.

Southern Illinois University in Carbondale ranked number 23, due to the number of alums who work in “top secret” jobs. The amount of funding SIU receives from national security and defense agencies was another factor.

NIU Anthropology Museum Gets A New Name

Nov 4, 2015

The Anthropology museum at Northern Illinois University has been renamed to honor the contributors of a major gift.

Founded in 1964, the NIU museum will now be known as the James B. and Rosalyn L. Pick Museum of Anthropology. James B. Pick is an alumnus of NIU with a master's degree in education.

WUIS

The Illinois State Board of Education released loads of data on Friday, when the latest statewide report card debuted. But it doesn't include other information school officials say they'd really like to get ahold of.

The school report card shows student demographic trends, class size, graduation rates and how well teachers at any given district are paid compared with the state average.

But a key indicator of academic progress? That's not posted.

Flickr user Brent Hoard "ECU School of Education Class Room" (CC BY 2.0)

The diversity makeup of Illinois schools is changing. That’s according to information released by the state.

If you moved every desk, from every Illinois school, into one giant classroom, more than half of the kids in those seats would be students of color.

That's on par with national figures. Last year, the U.S. Department of Education signaled that minorities would outnumber whites at the nation's public schools.

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner has so far focused his attention on business and union issues, and restructuring state government - like workers' compensation, tort reform and legislative term limits.

But what about his education agenda?

Before he was governor, Rauner was a wealthy private equity investor known in some circles for his involvement in education. There's even a charter school named after him: Chicago's Rauner College Prep.

Carl Nelson / WNIJ

There’s no end in sight to the political gridlock in Springfield. But one group says it has an education plan that could get Republican and Democratic support.

It’s a new twist on an old idea: corporations paying money into a special fund. They’d get tax breaks. And parents would get cash to use for the school of their choice.

Governor Bruce Rauner has drawn a hard line when it comes to his pro-business, anti-union policies. And Democrats - they’re not crossing over. It’s part of why there’s a budget stalemate.

Flickr user / alamosbasement "old school" (CC BY 2.0)

Classes will start 25 minutes later next year at one northern Illinois school. That’s so students have more time to sleep.

The Stevenson High School board approved the change, and it will take effect in August 2016. The Lincolnshire school's day will begin at 8:30 a.m. instead of 8:05 a.m.

Classes and passing periods will be shortened, because the school day will still end at 3:25 p.m.

illinois.edu

Illinois' nine public universities have gone four months without money from the state.  University presidents have said it's putting their institutions "at the brink of serious operational damage."

University of Illinois President Tim Killeen spoke to a reporter as he was leaving the governor's office.

"We had a very candid conversation about, about strategies going forward."

Killeen says that did not include any guarantee the schools will get their money anytime soon.

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