FOIA

Chase Cavanaugh/WNIJ

The DeKalb County government employees got some insight Thursday night into how to comply with the Freedom of Information Act and Open Meetings Act. These rules are invoked frequently when the actions of area governments and other public bodies come under scrutiny.

Leah Bartelt of the Illinois Attorney General’s Public Access Bureau offered an in-depth explanation of the state’s FOIA and OMA rules. 

The Illinois Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the Illinois High School Association has no obligation to release internal documents.  

The watchdog Better Government Association wanted to get records from the IHSA (which organizes high school athletic tournaments) on its sponsorship deals with the likes of Gatorade and Nike. To this end, it filed requests under the Freedom of Information Act, which  is supposed to make sure anyone can get documents, memos, and even emails from a government body. However, the court treats IHSA as a private non-profit organization.

CREDIT "COURTROOM ONE GAVEL" BY FLICKR USER BETH CORTEZ-NEAVEL / (CC BY 2.0)

An Illinois appellate court has ruled that the College of DuPage Foundation is subject to the state's open records law and ordered it to turn over a federal subpoena requested by the Chicago Tribune.

The Tribune reports that the unanimous decision marks the first time an Illinois higher court has ruled in favor of releasing records in possession of a public college's fundraising organization.

The ruling upholds an earlier ruling by a DuPage County Circuit Court judge.

Katie Finlon / WNIJ

An Illinois watchdog group takes a case against the Illinois High School Association to the state's highest court Tuesday. That’s regarding whether IHSA is subject to the state’s Freedom of Information Act.

Flickr user Ryo Chijiiwa / "Tommy Guns" (CC BY 2.0)

In the wake of the recent mass shooting at an Orlando nightclub, an Illinois legislator has a plan he says is a new path to keeping firearms from terrorists.

    

A plan before Congress seeks to ban anyone on the terrorism watch list from being able to buy a gun.

The proposal just introduced by Illinois State Representative Greg Harris, a Chicago Democrat, takes another tack.

It would essentially prevent anyone charged with making a terrorist threat from having gun.

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