Gov. Pat Quinn

Rockford's casino
6:37 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Quinn Vetoes Gambling Expansion Bill

Gov. Pat Quinn

Gov. Pat Quinn waited until the last minute to act on a plan that would have given Illinois five new casinos – including one in Rockford – and allowed slot machines at horse race tracks.  

Rockford Mayor Larry Morrissey expressed disappointment at the veto but was optimistic that a Rockford-based casino could be approved in the November veto session.

Read more
Illinois
8:37 am
Fri December 7, 2012

Illinois Watching Mississippi Water Levels

Illinois government is keeping a close eye on conditions along the Mississippi River. Governor Pat Quinn says he's working "night and day" with other top Illinois leaders on ways to address the critically low water levels on the river.

Read more
Thomson Correctional Center
2:31 pm
Tue October 2, 2012

Prison Sale Moves Ahead; 1,100 Jobs Expected

Thomson Correctional Center
Thomson Correctional Center

The federal Bureau of Prisons today filed documents in federal court in Rockford to acquire Thomson Correctional Center at a price of $165 million. More than 1,100 jobs are expected to be generated once the facility is fully operational.

The announcement was made this afternoon at the prison by Gov. Pat Quinn, U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL), and Thomson Mayor Jerry “Duke” Hebeler, who initially proposed in 2009 that the prison be sold to the federal government as an economic boost  to the area.

Read more
-Illinois
12:07 pm
Tue July 17, 2012

Boom planting turning into bust crops in Illinois

Gov. Pat Quinn tours an Illinois corn field
Illinois Farm Bureau

Quinn tours drought-stricken Southern Illinois farm

With the warm spring, farmers were able to plant early and corn and soy seeds went in at a remarkable pace.

"We were set out to raise what we thought was probably the largest corn crop in the history of American agriculture," Said Illinois Farm Bureau President Phillip Nelson.

Instead, months of drought are killing those expectations ... and the corn. Nelson says some farmers will end up with no crop, or only half of one.

Read more

Pages