Government

Government and Legislature

Polls closed at 7 p.m. Tuesday for April 5 Illinois Consolidated Election. There are approximately 1,600 races across 18 counties of northern Illinois -- plus a handful of referenda.

Decisions will be made on school, library district, park district, township and village board members as well as a variety of individual offices.

The following counties have provided links for election results. Simply click on the county name below to be connected to the web page for unofficial results:

The decision on whether passenger rail service will come to Rockford as proposed depends on the State of Illinois, not on Amtrak.

“The currently proposed service to Rockford would require state support,” Amtrak spokesman Marc Magliari told WNIJ News in an e-mail. “The state will decide how much service it will contract with Amtrak to provide.”

Magliari responded to reports that Amtrak representative Ray Lang told the House Public Safety Appropriations Committee that Rockford will not get Amtrak passenger rail service any time in the near future,

State Senator Suggests Public Universities Should Privatize

Mar 24, 2015
senate.gop

Less regulation and more freedom to make decisions -- these are among the things State Sen. Bill Brady says public universities would gain in Illinois if his bill to privatize them becomes law.

The Bloomington Republican introduced a bill asking the six public institutions to plan for a six-year evolution to privatization.

He says campuses already have been coping with falling state support for years. But Brady resists the suggestion his measure could accelerate the slide.

Illinois Child Care Bureau

There's been a lot of attention on the effect of the budget shortfall's immediate effect on a state-subsidized day care program in Illinois. But child care providers and parents are also worried about Gov. Bruce Rauner's proposed cuts to next year's budget.

Flickr user Daniel Borman / "Money, Money, Money" (CC BY 2.0)

Unions and other advocates for raising Illinois' minimum wage won a small victory yesterday. For the first time in years, an increase is advancing in the Illinois House.  

Even Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner says he can get behind it — if it comes after a long list of pro-business legislation.

Democrat Art Turner, from Chicago, got the measure through a committee on a party-line vote.

state of Illinois

The Illinois Supreme Court has opened its doors for a special evening session tonight. The justices want Gov. Bruce Rauner and other legislators to meet and watch as they hear a case. 

Chief Justice Rita Garman says in a news release that she wants to give lawmakers a window into the system's essential checks and balances. 

Rauner's office announced that he will attend the session, beginning at 6:20 p.m.

Illinois residents surprised by a tax penalty for being uninsured will get another chance to sign up for coverage.

A special enrollment period under President Barack Obama's health care law starts Sunday and runs through April 30th.

Officials say it's the last chance for those who do not have coverage to avoid paying an even bigger fine when they file their taxes next year. 

childcarecenter.us

Protestors filled the Illinois capitol yesterday and staged a small sit-in in front of Gov. Bruce Rauner's office. They're trying to pressure Rauner and legislators to come up with money for a program that helps low-income families afford daycare. 

Valena Mulonzi works at Steps to the Future daycare in Calumet City. She says lawmakers should listen to parents' pleas.

ilga.gov

Illinois legislators will hold a hearing today on a proposal to eliminate a benefit for state university employees.

The children of those workers can receive a 50 percent tuition waiver at any state school. Employees must work at a university seven years before they’re eligible.

State Sen. John Sullivan, D-Rushville, says the program could be used as a bargaining chip to avoid other proposed cuts involving higher education.

state of Illinois

Lawmakers will have nearly two billion dollars less to work with as they craft next year's budget.

There's one big reason Illinois isn't going to have that $1.9 billion to spend on assets like education, health care, foster care and long-term care.

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