Government

Government and Legislature

A Northern Illinois University professor was one of the hundreds of demonstrators at O’Hare International Airport last weekend. The protests were against President Donald Trump’s travel restrictions against people from majority-Muslim countries.

NIU education professor Joseph Flynn says he saw many walks of life take part in the O’Hare Airport demonstrations – including several different races and creeds and members of the LGBTQ community.

Brian Mackey / Illinois Public Radio

Top leaders in the Illinois Senate continue to negotiate on a "grand bargain" to end the state's budget standoff.

They left the Capitol on an 11-day break Thursday without voting on the proposals.

Senate President John Cullerton, a Democrat, is negotiating with his Republican counterpart.

He told his colleagues: When the session resumes next month, come back ready to vote.

"The problems we face are not going to disappear. In fact, they're going to get more difficult every day,” Cullerton said.

"United States Capitol" by Flickr User Cliff / (CC X 2.0)

GOP leaders in the House and Senate say torturing suspected terrorists is illegal, and that stand distances them from President Donald Trump's endorsement of the effectiveness of harsh interrogation techniques.

The U.S. has a legal ban on torture.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky tells reporters that virtually all GOP senators ``are comfortable with the state of the law on that issue.''

And House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin says: ``Torture's not legal. And we agree with it not being legal.''

State of Illinois

The Senate adjourned abruptly early Wednesday evening after Democrats and Republicans held private caucus meetings that lasted more than three hours.

 

A spokesman for Democratic Senate President John Cullerton issued a statement saying Senate leaders continue to discuss the massive compromise plan, and the Senate will return to session today.

whitehouse.gov

President Obama holds what the White House bills as his final news conference this afternoon. NPR and WNIJ will bring it to you live beginning at 1:00. 

A spokesman for Obama told CBS News the president has called this press conference because he wants to say farewell to the White House press corps and "show them the respect they've earned." 

You can listen to WNIJ's coverage on 89.5 FM and WNIJ.org

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