Government

Government and Legislature

DeKalb Police Department

In response to a Florida massacre and the killing of a Chicago police officer, the Democrat-controlled Illinois House pushed through some gun control measures Wednesday, endorsing a bump-stock ban and a minimum age of 21 for buying assault-style weapons.

The House voted to prohibit the sale of bump stocks and "trigger cranks," which increase the firing rates of rifles, effectively making them assault-style weapons. Also approved was a bar on anyone younger than 21 buying assault-style weapons of the type used in the shooting deaths of 17 students in Parkland, Fla.

Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Updated at 10:26 p.m. ET

President Trump sought to strike a unifying tone with his first State of the Union address, but some of his rhetoric has been aimed clearly at his base on immigration and his promise to put "America First."

U.S. Congress

Although they are from different political parties, two members of Congress from northern Illinois expressed remarkably similar sentiments Monday about the Senate action attempting to end the government shutdown and what lies ahead.

In separate interviews with WNIJ News, Republican Adam Kinzinger of the 16th District and Democrat Cheri Bustos of the 17th District both agreed that it is better to have the government open in order to move forward.

Neither of them liked the string of short-term continuing budget resolutions that led to the three-day shutdown.

Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

A partial government shutdown now looks inevitable after the Senate lacks the votes on a stopgap spending bill late Friday night.

The vote was 50-48 in favor of the measure with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., yet to vote.

The White House, Senate Republicans and Senate Democrats were unable to reach a deal to get to the 60 votes needed to proceed after a flurry of meetings, leading to finger-pointing and blame over who was responsible for the unprecedented shutdown on the one-year anniversary of President Trump's inauguration.

Public interviews will be held Monday for 10 applicants who hope to serve as Winnebago County Clerk for the next 10 months.

The current clerk, Democrat Margie Mullins, announced last month that she will step down at the end of January.

State law requires that the appointee must be of the same political party as the outgoing clerk. Officials are checking primary voting records to ensure the party status of applicants.

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