Government and Legislature


Illinois Democrats approved legislation Thursday to require arbitration for union contract disputes.

The state's biggest public employee union -- The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, or AFSCME -- supports changing the process.

Contract negotiations between AFSCME and Gov. Bruce Rauner's office have stalled. Sen. Don Harmon, D-Oak Park, says the legislation would help both sides get a deal done.  

A police group says the lack of a state budget is making Illinois a more dangerous place to live.

Rauner touted proposals that would begin to inch toward his goal of reducing Illinois’ prison population by 25 percent over the next decade. But elsewhere in the Capitol, law enforcement officials warned that the lack of a state budget means crime prevention programs are shutting down.

“I am upset at the governor," Tom Weitzel, the police chief in Riverside, said.

Flickr user Matt A.J. / "Marco Rubio" (CC V 2.0)

The divide between Republicans about who their presidential nominee should be is playing out in harsh tones ahead of the Illinois primary.

Dan Duffy is a state senator from Chicago’s northwest suburbs. He’s an Illinois delegate for Florida Senator Marco Rubio.

Duffy says he’s tried to get Donald Trump supporters in Illinois to switch to his candidate.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Students at Rockford’s Guilford High School showed off their latest high-tech projects to Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner today.

Rauner stopped by the school to talk about education funding and to check out their innovative engineering-track programs. He pledged to increase K through 12 funding and reduce state mandates on schools.

The Republican governor also clued the students in on the partisan battles that were blocking progress on a state budget.

Sarah Mueller / Illinois Public Radio

The Fantasy Sports Trade Association and its 300 members -- which include ESPN and Yahoo -- are backing legislation that would make daily fantasy games legal in Illinois. It would also characterize the contests as games of skill.

Peter Schoenke, the association's chairman, said more than two million Illinois residents play the games for free and for cash prizes. He said studies show that there's more involved to winning than just leaving it up to fate.