health

WUIS

The rate of Illinois residents with health insurance continues to grow.

In 2013, nearly 18 percent of Illinois adults didn’t have insurance.

The next year, the Affordable Care Act took effect. The rate of uninsured dropped to 15 percent that year.

Last year, it continued to fall.

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control puts the figure at more than 10 percent. That insurance comes from Obamacare for many Illinoisans.

Associated Press / NPR

Pope Francis says contraception might be acceptable for women threatened by the Zika virus. 

John Peller with the AIDS Foundation of Chicago says that’s given him hope that the exception might extend to other communicable diseases.

“We’re glad to see that the Pope is opening the door to condom use in a public health emergency and we think it’s really high time that the church recognized the role that condoms can have as a critical public health tool,” Peller said. 

Rauner Admin. Progress In Poison Hotline Cuts

Nov 19, 2015
Illinois Poison Center

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner’s administration is moving forward with cuts to a poison hotline.

The Illinois Poison Center is a non-profit that includes a hotline to field calls from doctors, hospitals, or just people who are worried about something their kid ingested.

Now, the Poison Center stands to lose 2 million dollars in state money.

Rauner’s administration announced in June it wanted to stop the flow of government money for the program, since there isn’t a state budget. This week, the administration got the go-ahead to make that cut.

WUIS

Illinois’s lack of budget is threatening rape crisis services, programs that help women get screened for cervical cancer and the public health network. Senators meeting at the capitol Wednesday heard details of these and other woes. 

There's been a mumps outbreak at the University of Illinois, and measles are back, too.

“The reemergence of STDs – HIV.  The globalization of travel certainly puts these once-thought eradicated diseases back on our doorstep," says administrator of McLean County’s health department Walter Howe. 

Cancer May Be Caused By Bad Luck

Jan 5, 2015
MostlyScience.com

Most cancers can be attributed to bad luck rather than risk factors, like smoking. 

That’s according to a study in the journal Science.

Results show two thirds of the cancer types analyzed were caused by chance mutations. However, some of the most common and deadly cancers are still influenced by lifestyle.

Personality And Health May Be Connected

Dec 30, 2014

Your personality could influence your health.

That's according to a study published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology. Research shows extroverts tend to have stronger immune systems than introverts.

Experts say personality testing could help doctors design special treatments in the future.

Flickr user Tim Sackton / "Thanksgiving Turkey [327/366]" (CC v. 2.0)

Eating turkey leftovers may better your long-term health. That’s according to Medical News Today

Turkey helps keep insulin levels stable after meals. It also contains selenium--studies suggest the mineral may decrease the risk of prostate, lung, skin and other cancers.

A drug that makes most cancers more vulnerable to the body's immune system may mark a new era in treatment. That’s according to a study published in the journal Nature.

The medicine strips cancer cells of the "camouflage" they use to evade attack by the immune system.

In the study, some patients totally recovered from terminal bladder cancer.

Flickr user Tim Sackton / "Thanksgiving Turkey [327/366]" (CC v. 2.0)

Families planning a turkey dinner tomorrow should think about food safety. The Illinois health department says it's important to give a frozen turkey enough time to thaw thoroughly before cooking.

Thawing in the refrigerator takes about 24 hours for every four to five pounds and thawing in cold water takes about 30 minutes per pound.

That means a 20- to 24-pound turkey can take five or six days to thaw in the refrigerator. It takes 10 to 12 hours to thaw in cold water.

Working Non-Traditional Shifts Dulls Your Brain

Nov 4, 2014
Flickr user / Matt Seppings "Sunday night in the office..." (CC BY 2.0)

Working non-traditional hours can prematurely age the brain and dull intellectual ability. That's according to a study in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Scientists say a decade of shifts aged workers' brains by more than six years and took five years to reverse its effects. Disrupting body clocks come with other risks to shift workers, including breast cancer and obesity.

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