higher education

Illinois Board of Higher Education

The budget that Gov. Bruce Rauner proposed this week recommends a 16 percent cut to higher education. This year's proposed cut sounds gentler than the 32 percent reduction Rauner recommended last year. But instead of being spread across higher education, virtually all of the pain would fall upon the state's universities. 

These proposed reductions come after higher education has gone without state funding of any kind for more than seven months.

A group of Democratic lawmakers yesterday made a public ceremony out of delivering legislation to Gov. Bruce Rauner's office.

    

They're attempting to persuade him to fund MAP grants, which help low-income students cover tuition at Illinois colleges and universities.

Students and employees from several colleges applauded as State Senator Donne Trotter marched into Rauner's office.

Allen Miggins, an admissions counselor from MacMurray College in Jacksonville, said the ongoing budget impasse is making his job difficult on many levels.

College of DuPage

College campuses (and the politics behind them) are taking center stage in Springfield's festering stalemate.

Budget gridlock has kept money from going to higher education since July. Then, in a matter of hours on Thursday, Democratic lawmakers approved a plan that would pump $720 million dollars into the system. 

Republicans are calling it a "cruel hoax" that's giving students false hope, even though they, too, say they want to help higher ed. It's a scenario that demonstrates the partisan tensions -- and politics -- at play.

Flickr user Pictures of Money / "Money" (CC BY 2.0)

The president of the Federation of Independent Colleges is calling the lack of funding for higher education in Illinois a "crisis."

Dave Tretter's organization represents about 60 private colleges that get no state funding other than MAP grants -- the Monetary Award Program funds awarded to low-income students.

With the state in its seventh month without a budget, many schools have told students they'll have to repay the portion of tuition the state failed to cover.

Tretter says students will turn to neighboring states.

Flickr user Brent Hoard "ECU School of Education Class Room" (CC BY 2.0)

Public universities have responded to Gov. Bruce Rauner's criticism of their spending habits.

The Republican governor's deputy chief of staff sent a memo to lawmakers yesterday criticizing hefty tuition hikes over the decade and wasteful spending on administration and executive compensation.

But the memo didn't mention steep declines in state funding during the same period.

University of Illinois President Timothy Killeen says the school has taken steps since Rauner assumed office, like putting a freeze on hiring and tuition for instate students.

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