IDPH

"Syringe and Vaccine" by Flickr User NIAID / (CC X 2.0)

The Illinois Department of Public Health says it isn’t too early for residents to get their flu shot.

Flu season typically runs from October through March, and it takes about two weeks for the vaccine to take effect. That’s why Public Health Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jennifer Layden says it’s a good time to get immunized. 

"There's several options," she said. "There's multiple flu vaccines. The main message is we do not recommend, nor does the CDC, that individuals get the nasal spray."

Intel Free Press/Flickr

Vehicle accidents are a leading cause of death for children. In 2011, the most recent data from the Illinois Department of Public Health, 11.5% of children ages 1 through 4 died in a car accident. There are measures parents can take to keep their young children safe. However, a new survey shows many don't.  

Early Finding For West Nile Virus In Sterling

Jul 18, 2017

A batch of mosquitoes recently tested positive for West Nile Virus in Whiteside County. Health officials say it’s an early result in the testing season.

Health officials have been testing for West Nile Virus since 2002.

Gene Johnston, Director of Environmental Health at the Whiteside County Health Department, says it’s common to get positive results -- but usually in August or September.

"Box of Kleenex" by Flickr User m01229 / (CC X 2.0)

Cases of influenza are spiking nationwide and across the state as public health officials urge that it's not too late to get a flu shot.

Hospitals across Illinois counties are seeing more people coming in with flu-like symptoms and testing positive for the illness. 

Common symptoms include a fever of 100 degrees or higher, along with a cough and sore throat. 

Cases Of HIV Continue To Drop In Illinois

Oct 31, 2016

A new report shows there were a little more than 1,500 cases of HIV in the state last year, which is a two percent drop from 2014.

However, Illinois ranks eleventh in the nation for rates of other STD’s like Chlamydia and Syphilis.

Governor Bruce Rauner enacted a law to provide insurance coverage for HIV prevention and treatment medicines.

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