Illinois

State of Illinois

Illinois is chasing a moving target as it tries to dig out of the nation's worst budget crisis, and $7.5 billion worth of unpaid bills hadn't even been sent to the official who writes the checks by the end of June.

The Associated Press obtained the review, conducted by Comptroller Susana Mendoza's office. Although many of those unprocessed bills have since been paid, the office says a similar amount have replaced them.

That's in addition to $9 billion worth of checks that are at the office but being delayed because the state lacks the money to pay them.

Flickr user Charleston's TheDigitel / "Red Cross blood drive" (CC V. 2.0)

It’s been more than a week since the mass shooting in Las Vegas, but northern Illinois blood banks say local donations still may be needed in the weeks to come.

Many survivors still need surgeries after the attack, and blood donations have only a 42-day shelf life.

Some blood centers in northern Illinois have shipped donations before to areas in need, as they did after Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. They say they’re on standby to ship blood to Las Vegas.

FLICKR User Jim Bowen

Illinois politicians continue reacting to Sunday’s mass shooting in Las Vegas, but responses are falling down party lines.

As happens with just about every mass shooting, and the more routine violence that plagues parts of cities like Chicago, Democrats say it shows the need for tighter gun laws.

Illinois U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin says military-grade weapons should not be considered normal.

But Republicans prefer to set aside those conversation, which is what Gov. Bruce Rauner did when asked whether he would support a so-called assault weapons ban.

Phil Masterton / WNIJ

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner is talking about building a movement to improve the state’s political and economic climate.

But he still wouldn’t say whether he will run for re-election.

Several Republican lawmakers say Rauner lost their support after the governor signed a bill last week that allows state money to help pay for abortions.

One said a primary challenger is inevitable, though nobody has yet stepped forward.

"Courtroom One Gavel" by Flickr User Beth Cortez-Neavel / (CC BY 2.0)

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments today in Gill v. Whitford, a Wisconsin case challenging partisan legislative maps.

Wendy Tam Cho, a University of Illinois political science professor, says this case is particularly important because it could determine the court’s role in future cases on gerrymandering. 

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