Illinois Attorney General

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The Illinois Supreme Court won't immediately consider Attorney General Lisa Madigan's appeal of a circuit court ruling that state workers must be paid during the state budget impasse.

Justices on Monday denied Madigan's request to bypass the appellate court and take the matter directly to the Supreme Court.

Madigan argues the Illinois Constitution requires an enacted appropriation for state spending.

The Democrat says stopping state-employee paychecks would hasten a budget agreement.

Carl Nelson / WNIJ

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan says student borrowers dealing with mounting loan debt are making up a greater number of consumer complaints to her office.

Madigan released her annual top-ten list of such complaints on Monday. She says consumer debt and identity theft were the top two issues drawing complaints for the ninth straight year.

The attorney general's office reports receiving nearly 24,000 complaints during 2016. Nearly 1,700 education-related complaints were the sixth-most common last year, up one spot from 2015.

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan has convened legal and civil rights organizations in the wake of what she calls ``troubling'' executive orders issued by President Donald Trump.

  

Groups attending Thursday's summit include Arab American Family Services, the Chicago Urban League and Lambda Legal. Group leaders say they fear escalating hate crimes.

The attempt by Illinois House Democrats to make sure state workers can be paid without a budget was suspended Thursday in the face of opposition from Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner.

A court order has kept paychecks flowing since July 2015, but Attorney General Lisa Madigan is asking a judge to review that decision.

Rauner says he wants workers to be paid, but he came out hard against the Democratic plan, which would assure their paychecks only through June 30.

Flickr user 401(K) 2012 / "Money" (CC v. 2.0)

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan is asking a judge to tell state employees: No budget, no paycheck.

Polling says most Illinois residents don't think they’re affected by the lack of a state budget. And a judge had ruled originally that state employees had to be paid for the work that they do.  That could all change if a St. Clair County judge accepts Lisa Madigan's legal arguments.  

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