Illinois Attorney General

Twitter: @_ErikaHarold

A lawyer who is a former Miss America says she's running for Illinois attorney general.

Erika Harold of Urbana announced plans Tuesday for a Republican bid to challenge four-term Democratic Attorney General Lisa Madigan in 2018.

Harold, 37, works as an attorney with the Meyer Capel law firm. She says in a statement that career politicians have "made it a nightmare for too many families in our state" and that Illinois needs a government that "works for them, not the powerful."

Attorney General Lisa Madigan argued in court Tuesday that paying state employees removes “any imperative” for Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner and the General Assembly to “fulfill their basic constitutional obligations ... and resolve their budget impasse.”

Madigan is trying to halt state employee paychecks. She said only the General Assembly can approve state spending, which means Illinois does not have the legal authority to make payroll.

Attorney General Lisa Madigan is pushing legislation aimed at protecting Illinois students who take out college loans.

The plan would establish a “student loan bill of rights” outlining information that companies have to provide to borrowers, including all repayment options. It also would require student-loan servicers to get a state license and create a student-loan ombudsman in the attorney general's office.

illinoiscourts.gov

The Illinois Supreme Court won't immediately consider Attorney General Lisa Madigan's appeal of a circuit court ruling that state workers must be paid during the state budget impasse.

Justices on Monday denied Madigan's request to bypass the appellate court and take the matter directly to the Supreme Court.

Madigan argues the Illinois Constitution requires an enacted appropriation for state spending.

The Democrat says stopping state-employee paychecks would hasten a budget agreement.

Carl Nelson / WNIJ

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan says student borrowers dealing with mounting loan debt are making up a greater number of consumer complaints to her office.

Madigan released her annual top-ten list of such complaints on Monday. She says consumer debt and identity theft were the top two issues drawing complaints for the ninth straight year.

The attorney general's office reports receiving nearly 24,000 complaints during 2016. Nearly 1,700 education-related complaints were the sixth-most common last year, up one spot from 2015.

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