Illinois Supreme Court

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A divided Illinois Supreme Court says it was OK for the government to seize a woman’s Harley-Davidson — even though it was her husband who used it to drive drunk.

Petra Henderson had been driving her husband to various bars, but eventually he jumped on her Harley and basically told her: Get on or walk home.

The state says by getting on, Henderson was consenting to let her husband drive, and basically enabling a crime.

Five of the Supreme Court justices agreed with that logic.

Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

The Illinois Supreme Court has heard arguments over a state law that forbids sex offenders whose victims were children from entering public parks.

Illinois law already barred child sex offenders from approaching children in parks, but in 2010 the legislature made it even more restrictive, banning them from parks completely — whether or not kids are present.

Katherine Strohl’s client was arrested walking his dog in a park in Bolingbrook when no one else was around.

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The Illinois Supreme Court won’t decide on the legality of LaSalle County's SAFE unit until at least September.

illinoiscourts.gov

The Illinois Supreme Court won't immediately consider Attorney General Lisa Madigan's appeal of a circuit court ruling that state workers must be paid during the state budget impasse.

Justices on Monday denied Madigan's request to bypass the appellate court and take the matter directly to the Supreme Court.

Madigan argues the Illinois Constitution requires an enacted appropriation for state spending.

The Democrat says stopping state-employee paychecks would hasten a budget agreement.

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The Supreme Court won't hear an appeal challenging Illinois' system for issuing permits for people to carry concealed weapons in public.

The justices on Monday let stand a lower court ruling that upheld the state's requirements for obtaining a concealed-carry license.

Three men sued state officials after they said a state review board denied their permit requests without offering an adequate explanation. After the state amended its regulations in 2015, the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the new requirements.

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