Illinois Supreme Court

illinoiscourts.gov

The Illinois Supreme Court won't immediately consider Attorney General Lisa Madigan's appeal of a circuit court ruling that state workers must be paid during the state budget impasse.

Justices on Monday denied Madigan's request to bypass the appellate court and take the matter directly to the Supreme Court.

Madigan argues the Illinois Constitution requires an enacted appropriation for state spending.

The Democrat says stopping state-employee paychecks would hasten a budget agreement.

"SW1911PD" by Flickr User Teknorat / (CC X 2.0)

The Supreme Court won't hear an appeal challenging Illinois' system for issuing permits for people to carry concealed weapons in public.

The justices on Monday let stand a lower court ruling that upheld the state's requirements for obtaining a concealed-carry license.

Three men sued state officials after they said a state review board denied their permit requests without offering an adequate explanation. After the state amended its regulations in 2015, the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the new requirements.

Flickr user Mark Hillary / "My bed" (CC BY 2.0)

The Illinois Supreme Court considered a case Thursday that asks whether not-for-profit hospitals have to pay property taxes.

The case involves Urbana-based Carle hospital and clinics — though it could affect health systems across Illinois.  

At issue is the constitutionality of a state law that exempts not-for-profit hospitals from paying property taxes.

Laurel Prussing, the mayor of Urbana, says losing that tax money cost the city 11 percent of its tax base. 

The company behind the proposed Rock Island Clean Line says pending legal proceedings in Illinois prompted it to withdraw its request to approve the Iowa leg of its project. 

illinoiscourts.gov

The Illinois Supreme Court has upheld a barrier to suing for "negligent infliction of emotional distress." It’s called the “impact rule.”

The rule is simple: in order to claim someone’s negligence caused you distress, you have to be “impacted.” Literally have something or someone make physical contact with you.

The case was brought by a Northbrook woman whose home was in foreclosure. She was startled when a contractor hired by Chase Home Finance entered what he thought was an abandoned home -- startled, but not “impacted."

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