legionnaires'

Feds Reimburse $4M For Quincy Veterans Home Water System

Feb 1, 2017
CDC

The federal government is reimbursing Illinois more than $4 million for a new water treatment facility at a Quincy veterans home that was the site of a Legionnaires Disease outbreak.

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner said Wednesday that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs was awarding the money to the Illinois Department of Veterans' Affairs, which would reimburse the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency.

An outbreak of the disease killed 12 people and sickened at least 54 in 2015 and a federal report found the bacteria was likely spread by an aging water system.

CDC

State officials are looking into more than a dozen cases of respiratory illness at a LaSalle Veterans' Home.

Eleven residents tested positive with pneumonia over the past several months. One of the residents also tested positive for Legionnaires' disease. A spokesperson for the Department of Veterans' Affairs says the 97-year-old resident had multiple underlying issues and has since died.

Two other people in LaSalle County tested positive for Legionnaires' disease.

CDC

Illinois officials have confirmed another new case of Legionnaires' disease at a veterans' home in Quincy.

The directors of the Illinois departments of veterans' affairs and public health said in a joint statement Thursday that three residents testing positive for the disease were recovering.

State officials said last month that two residents at the Illinois Veterans Home in western Illinois were sick. These are new cases.

Last year an outbreak killed 12 and sickened 54.

CDC

The head of a suburban Chicago school district that evacuated because Legionella was found says there is a lack of public health guidance for schools to help deal with the bacteria.

Elgin Area School District U-46 CEO Tony Sanders tells the (Arlington Heights) Daily Herald that he didn't receive guidance from state or federal agencies on when it was safe to reopen schools and it "was incredibly frustrating.''

The district evacuated and shut three schools for three days last month after high levels of Legionella were found in water cooling towers.  

Durbin.senate.gov

With a possible federal government shutdown on the horizon, U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) says the consequences for his home state would be especially dire if it occurs while Illinois remains without a state budget.

“When we have government shutdown in Washington as we did several years ago, innocent people are going to suffer as a result of it,” Durbin said Friday, standing in front of military planes at Scott Air Force Base. “And we can certainly know the impact it’s going to have on some groups, not the least of which will be federal employees.”

Pages