medical marijuana

A judge has ordered Illinois health officials to reconsider their decision not to include migraine headaches on the list of conditions that qualify for use of medical marijuana in the state.

The Chicago Tribune reports that a Cook County judge overturned Illinois Department of Public Health Director Dr. Nirav Shah's denial of a petition to add migraines to the list.

The court ruling was in response to a suit filed by an unidentified man who has already been using marijuana to treat his headaches.

The Illinois medical marijuana industry saw $2.57 million in retail sales during June, a sign of continuing steady growth of the retail market.

The Illinois Department of Agriculture released the figures Thursday.

May sales had been nearly $2.3 Illinois now has nearly 7,600 qualified medical marijuana patients and 39 registered dispensaries.

June's figures bring the total retail sales of marijuana in Illinois to $13.8 million since purchasing began Nov. 9.

First Medical Marijuana Clinic In Sauk Valley Opens

Jul 8, 2016
flickr/dankdepot

  Fulton will become the home of the Sauk Valley’s first medical marijuana dispensary.  

Saukvalley.com reports the facility is located on 16th Avenue of the Whiteside County city and will serve about 150 regional residents with permits for prescription cannabis. 

Currently, Illinois patients are eligible for a medical marijuana permit if they have one of 39 conditions, such as cancer, glaucoma, and post-traumatic stress disorder.  About 7,900 people statewide have such permits.  

Governor Bruce Rauner signed Illinois Senate Bill 10 on Thursday.

It now gives post-traumatic stress disorder patients access to medical marijuana and extends the state’s pilot program until July 2020.

It also opens the program to those with a terminal illness with a diagnosis of six months or less.

And it will regulate how doctors approve patients for other debilitating medical conditions.

Judge Orders Illinois To Add PTSD To Medical Marijuana List

Jun 29, 2016

A Cook County judge has ordered Illinois to add post-traumatic stress disorder to the list of diseases eligible for medical marijuana treatment in a case filed by a military veteran.

Judge Neil Cohen on Tuesday ordered the Department of Public Health's director to add PTSD within 30 days.

The sternly worded ruling says Director Nirav Shah "engaged in a private investigation, hidden from public view" that was "constitutionally inappropriate."

A spokeswoman for Gov. Bruce Rauner says the Illinois medical marijuana program's director has resigned.

Spokeswoman Catherine Kelly tells The Associated Press the administration has accepted the resignation of Joseph Wright, who was in the position for just over one year. She says the governor's office "will have no further comment."

Wright will be replaced by Jack Campbell, the program's bureau chief in the Department of Agriculture.

Medical marijuana retail shops in Illinois saw a slight increase in sales in May compared to the previous month.

Program director Joseph Wright says registered dispensaries sold nearly $2.3 million worth of marijuana in May to more than 5,100 patients. April sales were $2.2 million.

May's figures bring the total retail sales of marijuana in Illinois to $10.8 million since purchasing began Nov. 9, topping the $10 million mark for the first time.

Illinois now has 37 registered dispensaries and about 7,000 qualified patients.

The Illinois House has approved a plan to expand the state's medical marijuana pilot program by two-and-a-half years and add post-traumatic stress disorder and terminal illness to the list of allowed conditions.

Lawmakers voted 86-27 on Monday to advance the measure, which Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner supports.

It now goes to the Senate, where it's expected to pass.

Illinois' four-year pilot program is set to sunset at the end of 2017. Under the bill, it will continue to July 1, 2020.

Where Illinois’ Medical Marijuana Program Stands

May 27, 2016

Illinois’ medical marijuana program is just getting started.  The first stores opened last fall and some 6,000 people are now approved to buy cannabis through the pilot program. That number is much smaller than what many advocates say is needed to create a viable business.  There are a number of factors behind the slower-than-expected rollout of a pilot program scheduled to expire in January 2018.

Illinois patients who want to use medical marijuana legally will try again to expand the program to include chronic pain, diabetes, migraine and other health conditions.

Monday's meeting of the state's Medical Cannabis Advisory Board could lead to new recommendations, but Gov. Bruce Rauner's administration has twice before rejected the board's suggestions.

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