Michael Madigan

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Accusations of harassment from a campaign worker against her supervisor and close aide to Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan, Kevin Quinn, led to Quinn’s firing last month. Madigan is still struggling with the ripple effects from Alaina Hampton’s claims, with some observers predicting this could be the downfall for the powerful politician.

Hampton’s story has also brought attention to how political campaigns deal with sexual harassment.

File photo by Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan continues to push back against accusations that his office mishandled sexual harassment complaints. 

The Speaker issued a one-page press release Tuesday with brief summaries of nine complaints involving staffers working in his state office. It’s the product of an internal investigation Madigan launched after firing two high-ranking campaign workers.

File photo by Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Chris Kennedy said this week House Speaker Michael Madigan should step down as head of the Democratic Party at least temporarily, while state Sen. Daniel Biss said he hopes Madigan’s firing of the aide accused of harassment isn’t just political damage control. Frontrunner J.B. Pritzker has been more tentative in his response. 

The speaker fired Kevin Quinn earlier this week after Madigan’s lawyer spent three months investigating accusations that Quinn harassed a campaign staffer.     

File photo by Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan has dismissed a long-time political consultant after an investigation found he sent inappropriate text messages to a colleague.

Madigan identified the consultant as Kevin Quinn in a statement Monday.

Madigan attorney Heather Wier Vaught says the woman is a political consultant not employed by Madigan.

Vaught says Quinn texted the woman seeking a date in 2016. There were fewer than a dozen texts but they continued after the woman told Quinn she wasn't interested.

State Representative Scott Drury says the Democratic Party in Illinois is behind the times and he blames that on House Speaker Michael Madigan, the party chairman.

Drury said legislative leaders like Madigan should be term limited and should not have second jobs.

He compared Madigan to a literary villain Who-Must-Not-Be-Named while speaking - fittingly - at a Chicago Public Library.

“It’s almost as if there is a Voldemort in the State of Illinois,” Drury said. “And no one wants to use his name. And if you can’t use his name, how are you going to fix the problem?"

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