Obamacare

U.S. Senator Durbin Condemns GOP Healthcare Plan

Mar 24, 2017
durbin.senate.gov

Illinois U.S. Senator Dick Durbin took a swipe at the Republican healthcare plan in Springfield Friday.

Republicans could not get the votes to pass the measure, even though both the president and the speaker of the House put their full weight behind the plan. Durbin says in Washington, that usually means a slam dunk.

“When the president puts his reputation on the line, whoever that president may be, they’ve never lost. Underline the word never,” Durbin said. “Ultimately, I expect the Trump and Paul Ryan effort to succeed in the House. If it doesn’t, it’s historic.”

Flickr user / Images Money "Healthcare Costs" (CC BY 2.0)

Rockford residents who are getting their health insurance through the Illinois exchange under the current Affordable Care Act will lose an estimated average of $3,662 in subsidies under the proposed replacement American Health Care Act.

That’s a drop of more than 42 percent.

Moreover, Rockford would be the hardest-hit by the changes – and residents in only two other Illinois cities would see their subsidies shrink.

Jenna Dooley

Healthcare leaders are voicing concerns about the Republican repeal plan to the Affordable Care Act.

Democrat Dick Durbin is traveling the state to meet with those who would be affected by the House changes.

Phil Masterton / WNIJ

Governor Bruce Rauner says Illinois wouldn’t do very well under congressional Republicans’ new health care proposal.

  

Some conservative groups have also criticized the House GOP's new plan to replace the Affordable Care Act.

Rauner says he plans to talk to members of Congress and other governors about how to change the proposal.

“I want to make sure people in Illinois are not left in the lurch or that there’s a lot of pressure to reduce insurance coverage for people in Illinois,” Rauner said.

"Wheelchair" by Flickr User zeevveez / (CC X 2.0)

Illinois U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin had harsh words Monday for Republican proposals in Congress to repeal Obamacare and give states more responsibility in running Medicaid.

President Donald Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan have both said they’re in favor of so-called block grants; it would transform Medicaid into a system where each state receives a bulk payment from the federal government to pay for healthcare for the poor, elderly and disabled.

That means each state would have to figure out its own how to direct that money and what services to provide.

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