police

Michael Schmidt / AP

UPDATE: 2:10 p.m., 9/2/15

About 100 investigators are actively working on the investigation into the death of Fox Lake Police Lt. Joe Gliniewicz, Lake County law enforcement officials told a news conference this morning. Lake County Major Crimes Task Force Commander George Filenko said the active force is down from 400 during Tuesday's initial response.

No additional details were given of the three suspects -- described simply as two white males and one black male -- in the officer's death.

Katie Finlon / WNIJ

Getting a speeding ticket in Illinois will cost you an additional $5, at least. It's part of a new state law regulating police body cameras.

A year after Ferguson, Missouri erupted in protests following the shooting of Michael Brown, Illinois has a law that's described as "landmark."

That $5 per $40 in fines tacked onto traffic citations will be used to create a fund police departments can draw on to pay for the cameras. Once they get them, the law sets standards for their use.

Context - Safe Neighborhoods, Safe City: Changing Roles of Police and Community
Maria Boynton

There’s been a lot of news about strained relationships between police officers and the citizens they serve.   Police officials say they’re making changes to improve relations and build trust within the community but critics claim not enough is being done.

WNIJ's public forum, “Context - Safe Neighborhoods, Safe City: Changing Roles of Police and Community,” was held Thursday, August 27, 2015, at the Kresge Hall in the Riverfront Museum Park, in Rockford.

WNIJ Reporter Sue Stephens moderated the Context panel. Guests were:

Flickr user woodleywonderworks / "police trooper writing a ticket" (CC BY 2.0)

Police could soon be forced to hand out documentation when they stop someone. 

Members of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus say they have heard from constituents who claim they are repeatedly stopped by authorities. In some cases, more than once per day.

The lawmakers’ response is a plan to require officers hand out what are called “stop receipts.”

Representative Mary Flowers, a Democrat from Chicago, supports the idea:

thenorthstarnews.com / theblueline.com

Four police officers were released on a $10,000 bond Monday after they were charged with lying under oath in a 2013 drug case. 

Police Sgt. James Padar and officers William Pruente and Vince Morgan, all from Chicago, and Glenview officer James Horn were charged with felony perjury. There were questions about how evidence in a marijuana arrest was obtained.

Flickr user woodleywonderworks / "police trooper writing a ticket" (CC BY 2.0)

Most students learn the fourth amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects citizens from police searches and seizures. But how are police trained in the difference between reasonable suspicion and probable cause?

Police training in the state of Illinois -- whether it's full-time, part-time, military or quasi-military style -- requires 480 hours altogether.  Forty of those are called scenario training.

Police Recruitment Is Harder Than It Looks

Jun 3, 2015
policeprep.com, cops.usdoj.gov, wifr.com

Police departments across the country face new criticism in staff diversity now more than ever. But it's difficult to get -- and keep -- qualified and diverse candidates.

"Truthfully, recruitment is probably one of the toughest things that a small agency in particular, or a medium-sized agency, goes through," Cora Beem, the manager of mandated training for the Illinois Law Enforcement Training and Standards Board, said.

Flickr: West Midlands Police / Photo cropped from original

An Illinois proposal would provide funding for police body cameras.

The measure creates procedures for arrests and traffic stops, including pedestrian searches. Incidents like officer-involved shootings and arrests would have a standard protocol across Illinois, and the proposal would require more police training.

Funding would come from an increase in fines for traffic tickets.

Democratic Rep. Elgie Sims says when police officers wear body cameras, both the community and police benefit.

twitter.com/DixonPolice / Dixon Police

A police shooting-death in Ferguson, Missouri is the motivation behind a northern Illinois police chief's desire to put body cameras on his officers. Dixon police Chief Danny Langloss requested money from the city to buy eight cameras for the department. 

Langloss says he wanted the cameras after the August 20-14 death of Michael Brown. Brown's death sparked protests across the country and raised questions about increased oversight of police. As more cities consider the use of body cameras, a proposed Illinois law would establish guidelines for their use.

David Schaper / NPR

Nine months after the Illinois Supreme Court struck down the state’s eavesdropping law, the legislature passed a bill to replace it. The legislation, which defines eavesdropping and its consequences, is currently waiting on the governor's desk.

Already, the proposed law faces criticism, and a flurry of misinformation. 

Here's a sampling of some headlines from around the web:

"Illinois Passes Bill That Makes It Illegal To Record The Police"

"Illinois law would make recording the police a felony"

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