Politics

Political news

de.wikipedia.org

Federal lawmakers from Illinois and Missouri want the Obama Administration to scrap a proposed rule defining so-called “Waters of the United States.” They say the proposal gives the federal government too much control over water in yards and on farms.

Missouri Republican Vicky Hartzler is one of several lawmakers co-sponsoring legislation to block the new rule. Illinois U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis also is a sponsor for the bill.

rampcil.org

A group of social service advocates is out with a report looking at how northern Illinois would be affected by Governor Bruce Rauner’s proposed budget cuts. The RAMP Center for Independent Living is one of the agencies involved in the Responsible Budget Coalition’s analysis. 

It’s not a direct budget cut for RAMP; it’s a proposal to reduce the number of clients served by its Home Services Program by making it more difficult to qualify.

Where Is Ex-Rep. Aaron Schock?

May 1, 2015

An attorney pursuing a federal lawsuit against former U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock of Peoria says he can’t find the beleaguered Republican ex-lawmaker to serve him in the civil case.

Daniel Kurowski filed the lawsuit on April 15 on behalf of Chicago resident Howard Foster, who donated $500 to Schock’s campaign in 2012. Kurowski told U.S. District Judge Andrea Wood that he has been unable to locate Schock to serve papers.

Flickr user Daniel Borman / "Money, Money, Money" (CC BY 2.0)

A top official with Gov. Bruce Rauner's office confirms Illinois will restore $26 million in funding for a tobacco quitline, programs for autistic children and other social service grants. 

Projections show the state is taking in more money than expected.  While some cuts will remain, the windfall frees up money to reverse the cuts Rauner made with little warning on Good Friday, in early April.

The news has Joanne Guthrie-Gard beaming. 

"I'm ecstatic," she said. "I'm so excited."

Lawmakers Push For More Concussion Awareness

Apr 29, 2015
WUIS

A proposal in the Illinois Senate would make sure students are completely recovered from concussions before returning to athletics or the classroom.

Each year, there are 200,000 concussion-related emergency room visits for children and teenagers in the U.S. For one Chicago lawmaker, that’s not just a statistic.

Both of Democratic Sen. Kwame Raoul's kids have sustained concussions. Raoul says his teenage daughter, Mizan, is still recovering from one she received one when she was playing basketball in January. At first, nobody realized it was a concussion.

Flickr user Jim Bowen / "Illinois State Capitol" (CC BY 2.0)

Legislators have begun to discuss Gov. Bruce Rauner's agenda.

They split into seven so-called working groups. Members of both parties and chambers will meet with aides from the governor's office to talk about issues like workers' compensation, limits on torts, and taxes.

Flickr user Ryo Chijiiwa / "Tommy Guns" (CC BY 2.0)

The Illinois State Rifle Association president expects an appeal of a court ruling that upheld a Chicago suburb's ban on assault weapons. 

A panel of the 7th U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago declared Highland Park's assault weapons ban constitutional.

A dissenting opinion says individual citizens, not the government, should decide the most effective means of defense. However, the majority opinion says the gun ban does not violate the Second Amendment because it gives would-be owners other options, including buying a handgun. 

Flickr user 401(K) 2012 / "Money" (CC v. 2.0)

Illinois' second-richest man is backing Gov. Bruce Rauner's agenda, according to a campaign contribution filed on Monday.

Rauner is amassing enough money to dwarf that of his political foes.

Sam Zell sat out of Rauner's race for governor. State records show no listing of Zell giving any money leading up to the election last November.

But now Zell, a Chicago real estate and investment mogul, came through with a record-setting $4 million contribution. Not to the governor himself, but to his new "Turnaround Illinois" Political Action Committee.

Civic Education Could Be Required In All Illinois Schools

Apr 27, 2015
kids.usa.gov

Eighty-three percent of Illinois high schools already require some form of civic education. A measure approved by the Illinois House would require all schools to teach it.

"Obviously, with Illinois' reputation of corruption in politics, I think we need to have an emphasis on responsible citizens and dealing with those issues," Representative Donald Moffitt, a Republican from Galesburg, said.

Representative Deborah Conroy, a Democrat from Villa Park, says teaching students about government is imperative to building future leaders.

WUIS

Illinois could join a handful of states that allow cameras to be installed in the rooms of nursing home residents. 

Supporters say it would give families peace of mind to have electronic monitoring of the care their loved ones receive. But there are also concerns, especially when it comes to privacy.

"Nursing homes, a lot of people tend to forget ... that is their home," Hinsdale Republican Representative Patti Bellock said.

Supporters say the cameras would only be installed when the resident or family agrees. They would also have to cover the cost. 

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