Politics

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U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk (L) and Tammy Duckworth

U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth's campaign says she raised a record $2.7 million in the most recent quarter for her closely watched bid to unseat Republican U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk.

The Illinois Democrat enters the contest's final months with $5.5 million cash on hand.

Kirk's campaign hasn't released his fundraising totals for the three-month period that ended June 30.

Democrats see Illinois as one of the party's best opportunities to pick up a seat and potentially retake the Senate in November.

The FBI interviewed Hillary Clinton for the probe into her use of a private email server while she was Secretary of State on Saturday morning, according to a spokesman for Clinton.

Spokesman Nick Merrill said in a statement that the interview about her email arrangements was "voluntary" and adds, "She is pleased to have had the opportunity to assist the Department of Justice in bringing this review to a conclusion."

He says Clinton will not comment further about the interview "out of respect for the investigative process."

Northern Illinois University

Presidential candidate Donald Trump’s controversial remarks could affect the Illinois U.S. Senate race, according to one expert.

Northern Illinois University political scientist Matt Streb says he can’t remember a time when candidates distanced themselves from their party’s nominee. He says this is affecting the race between incumbent Republican Sen. Mark Kirk and Democratic Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth.

Winnebago County Bar Association

Illinois is approaching a new fiscal year without a state budget. The head of an organization that helps fund social service agencies says citizens need to demand more from their lawmakers. 

Paul Logli is president and CEO of United Way of Rock River Valley. He told the crowd at the Rockford Urban Ministries annual meeting Friday that no matter where they stand politically, they have to be unforgiving of ALL state lawmakers about the budget impasse.

Republican Mark Kirk Says He Won't Support Trump

Jun 7, 2016
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The junior U.S. Senator from Illinois has reached a breaking point in support for his party's presidential candidate.

Kirk said Tuesday that, as the presidential campaign progressed, he was hoping the rhetoric would tone down and reflect a campaign that’s "inclusive, thoughtful and principled."

But he says Trump’s latest statements about a federal judge of Mexican heritage were dead wrong and un-American.

Kirk has said he’d support the party’s nominee.

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