Quincy

Jason Parrott / Tri States Public Radio

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner used a trip to Quincy Tuesday afternoon to thank the Illinois General Assembly for passing a balanced budget that includes $53 million for the Illinois Veterans Home.

“Today is a very good day for our heroes here at the Quincy Veterans Home,” said Rauner. “It’s a very good day for our wonderful staff… this is an extended family here in this wonderful home, and it’s a great day for Adams County and all of Illinois.”

quincyivh.org

Governor Bruce Rauner’s administration says a costly rebuild of the Illinois Veterans' Home in Quincy is the best way to get rid of Legionella bacteria linked to more than a dozen deaths there. While some state legislators support the move, others remain skeptical.

quincyivh.org

A makeover of the Illinois Veterans Home at Quincy costing as much as $278 million is the best option for eradicating Legionnaires' disease there, a preliminary report says.

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Governor Bruce Rauner unveiled a plan for dealing with future outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease at the Illinois Veterans' Home in Quincy  during a stop at the home Thursday afternoon.

Rauner said temporarily relocating the roughly 350 residents would be risky, given their ages and health conditions. But he said if that is needed, some could be moved to the shuttered Sycamore Health Care building.

The state is trying to acquire and upgrade the former nursing home, which is several blocks from the Illinois Veterans' Home.

ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' AFFAIRS

Illinois is using emergency spending rules to upgrade the water system at the veterans’ home in Quincy. Outbreaks of the waterborne Legionnaires’ Disease have killed and sickened dozens of residents and staff.

Calling the current water system a “danger to public health,” the Department of Veterans' Affairs is buying $650,000 worth of new water filters, faucets, and bacteria monitoring equipment.

By declaring the purchases “emergencies,” the state is bypassing normal spending safeguards, which can add months of public scrutiny.

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