Science

Science news

There are a lot of unfamiliar aircraft in the skies over northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin this week. They’re on their way to the annual Experimental Aircraft Association get-together in Oshkosh. 

Tony Molinaro is with the Federal Aviation Administration for the Great Lakes region. He says as many as ten-thousand small planes converge on the small Wisconsin airport.

You’ll see them in the skies much more often. And not just the regular Pipers and regular planes, you know, the Cessnas. You’ll see the aircraft from WWII and all sorts of unusual planes.

KWMU

Women who are an unhealthy weight during their first pregnancy might have a false sense of security if their babies are born with no complications. But a new study out of Saint Louis University suggests complications can still arise when the women get pregnant for a second time — even if, by then, they have reached a healthy weight.

niaid.nih.gov

Researchers at Washington University near St. Louis have found that some multidrug-resistant bacteria intentionally get rid of the genes that protect them from antibiotics. That discovery could eventually provide a new way to treat deadly infections. 

Microbiologist Mario Feldman says some strains of a bacterium known as Asinetobacter baumannii are resistant to all antibiotics.

JJ Harrison / CC BY -SA 3.0

Mosquitoes have been plentiful -- and voracious -- this summer, thanks to heavy rains that have created perfect breeding habitats for the blood-suckers. Now researchers at the University of Illinois may have found a way to reduce future mosquito populations with the help of some native Midwestern plants.

Farmers Could Face More Violent Weather In Future

Jul 3, 2015
Abby Wendle / WIUM

Driving down a two-lane highway in rural Missouri, Matt Plenge squinted at a patch of gray clouds hanging low over his farm fields in the distance.  "Does it look hazy up there?" he asked. "We only had a 20% chance today. We shouldn't get any rain."

Plenge, like most farmers, always keeps one eye on the weather. But this spring, it’s been his primary and constant concern.

“It seems like it rains for three or four days and after it rains, we get one day of sunshine,” Plenge said. “And then it rains again.”

burpee.org

One of Rockford’s top tourist attractions turns ten this weekend. Burpee Museum of Natural History is holding a birthday party for “Jane,” the world’s most complete juvenile T-Rex.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

The word “hacker” can strike fear into the heart of anyone who has a credit card, a computer, or a smart phone. Saturday, June 6th, thousands of “civic hackers” across the country will reclaim the art of accessing data. Northern Illinois University is one of the sites where people can get together to observe the National Day of Civic Hacking. WNIJ’s Susan Stephens spoke with Tracy Rogers-Tryba of NIU’s Center for Governmental Studies.

Facebook Use Could Be A Personality Indicator

May 27, 2015
Facebook

If you post Facebook updates about your romantic partner, that could mean you have low self-esteem. 

That’s according to a study at Brunel University in London.

Five-hundred fifty-five Facebook users were observed in the study, and the users also completed surveys about self-esteem, narcissism, extroversion, neuroticism, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness.

wvdnr.gov

Illinois wildlife officials say a fungal disease killing millions of bats in the U.S. has turned up in Carroll, Pike and Adams counties. 

White-nose syndrome has been confirmed in 11 Illinois counties since it was first found in the state two years ago. The first discoveries in Illinois were in 2013 in LaSalle, Monroe, Hardin and Pope counties. It was found in Jackson, Johnson, Saline and Union counties earlier this year.  

The disease is named for the white fungus that appears on the animals' noses. 

flickr/dankdepot

Illinois marijuana patients may be jumping the gun by submitting applications for diseases that aren’t approved yet. 

The state Public Health department says such applications will be rejected and fees will be refunded.

Health officials say a handful of applications came in from patients with health conditions recommended by an advisory board last week, including migraines, osteoarthritis and PTSD.

Pages