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Farmers Could Face More Violent Weather In Future

20 hours ago
Abby Wendle / WIUM

Driving down a two-lane highway in rural Missouri, Matt Plenge squinted at a patch of gray clouds hanging low over his farm fields in the distance.  "Does it look hazy up there?" he asked. "We only had a 20% chance today. We shouldn't get any rain."

Plenge, like most farmers, always keeps one eye on the weather. But this spring, it’s been his primary and constant concern.

“It seems like it rains for three or four days and after it rains, we get one day of sunshine,” Plenge said. “And then it rains again.”

burpee.org

One of Rockford’s top tourist attractions turns ten this weekend. Burpee Museum of Natural History is holding a birthday party for “Jane,” the world’s most complete juvenile T-Rex.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

The word “hacker” can strike fear into the heart of anyone who has a credit card, a computer, or a smart phone. Saturday, June 6th, thousands of “civic hackers” across the country will reclaim the art of accessing data. Northern Illinois University is one of the sites where people can get together to observe the National Day of Civic Hacking. WNIJ’s Susan Stephens spoke with Tracy Rogers-Tryba of NIU’s Center for Governmental Studies.

Facebook Use Could Be A Personality Indicator

May 27, 2015
Facebook

If you post Facebook updates about your romantic partner, that could mean you have low self-esteem. 

That’s according to a study at Brunel University in London.

Five-hundred fifty-five Facebook users were observed in the study, and the users also completed surveys about self-esteem, narcissism, extroversion, neuroticism, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness.

wvdnr.gov

Illinois wildlife officials say a fungal disease killing millions of bats in the U.S. has turned up in Carroll, Pike and Adams counties. 

White-nose syndrome has been confirmed in 11 Illinois counties since it was first found in the state two years ago. The first discoveries in Illinois were in 2013 in LaSalle, Monroe, Hardin and Pope counties. It was found in Jackson, Johnson, Saline and Union counties earlier this year.  

The disease is named for the white fungus that appears on the animals' noses. 

flickr/dankdepot

Illinois marijuana patients may be jumping the gun by submitting applications for diseases that aren’t approved yet. 

The state Public Health department says such applications will be rejected and fees will be refunded.

Health officials say a handful of applications came in from patients with health conditions recommended by an advisory board last week, including migraines, osteoarthritis and PTSD.

National Weather Service

Tornado sirens are for people who are outdoors. For everyone else, there are a lot of options these days when it comes to staying on top of weather emergencies. Northern Illinois University meteorologist Gilbert Sebenste says the key word is “redundancy.”

Flickr user / Andrew "Chickens" (CC BY 2.0)

Agriculture officials in Iowa say bird flu will claim an additional four-million chickens on two more farms in a county already hit hard by the disease.

Officials say the latest outbreak of avian influenza has hit chickens at two farms in Iowa’s Wright County, although tests for the disease still need final confirmation. 

The county earlier reported a farm with almost three-million chickens affected.

Iowa's chicken loss is approaching 25 million.  That’s more than 40 percent of the state's egg-laying flock.

Flickr user William Brawley / "Day 286, Project 365 - 8.6.10" (CC BY 2.0)

The upcoming season could make an allergy sufferer’s eyes water.

A spring allergy outlook from Accuweather says a slow climb out of winter weather will delay the spring season. But when it hits early next month, it’ll be “intense.” 

The Illinois state climatologist says March was colder than normal and unusually snowy.

The statewide average temperature for the month was 38 degrees. That's three degrees colder than average.

Flickr user Thomas sauzedde / "Lucie & ses parents-4" (CC BY 2.0)

The amount of time parents spend with their kids has virtually no relationship to how children turn out.

That’s according to a study that will be published in the Journal of Marriage and Family. 

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