Sen. Andy Manar

Democratic state Sen. Andy Manar says he will remain in the Illinois Senate rather than run for governor in 2018.

In an emailed statement Friday, the Bunker Hill resident says he plans to continue being "a strong voice for the citizens of Central Illinois" in the Legislature.

Manar was among several Democrats who said they were considering running against Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner.

Among those who've announced they're running are state Sen. Daniel Biss, businessman Chris Kennedy and Chicago Alderman Ameya Pawar.

Last summer, Governor Bruce Rauner asked 20 lawmakers and a handful of educators to change how Illinois funds public schools. That bipartisan commission produced a “framework,” but no actual legislation.

 

That is despite the group’s continual focus on a plan favored by Rauner.

 

An Illinois lawmaker who represents a large number of state employees is once again challenging Republican Governor Bruce Rauner to personally negotiate with AFSCME, the state’s largest government union.

The union members will vote this month on authorizing a strike. AFSCME and the Rauner Administration have failed to reach agreement on a new contract. 

Democratic state senator Andy Manar of Bunker Hill says the governor needs to take steps to avoid a strike or a lockout.  

Susan Stephens/Roberta F / Creative Commons

Senate Democrats are taking another bite at the school funding apple.

Senator Andy Manar -- a Democrat from Bunker Hill -- has tried for years to get Illinois to send more money to poor districts.

Until now ... that has meant taking money from wealthier ones.

Manar's latest plan would still do that … but gradually. Next year, no district would lose state money.

Manar says his plan eliminates special deals, so all school funding is distributed fairly.

Flickr user Brent Hoard "ECU School of Education Class Room" (CC BY 2.0)

Senator Andy Manar has re-introduced a measure proposing to change the way schools are funded in Illinois. This time, it has new formulas and a request for more money. 

Like the version debated last session, which passed the Senate but stalled in the House, this formula would give more money to districts with low property values and high rates of poverty. 

Representative Sue Scherer, a Democrat from Decatur and a former teacher, talked about the inequity from personal experience.

Pages