state budget

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

A Rockford center serving people with chronic mental illness will stay open…for now. The Jubilee Center in downtown Rockford was slated to close this week after thirty years because of state funding problems. But Emanuel Episcopal Church came through with a 15-thousand dollar grant to keep it open until state funding is approved.  Baldemar Gallegos is the center’s site coordinator. He says a lot of people count on the Jubilee Center and its services.

Brian Mackey/WUIS

Governor Bruce Rauner has vetoed legislation that would have blocked public-employee strikes and management lockouts of those workers. He vetoed the bill in part because it was based on what he called the false premise he has been unreasonable in negotiating with state workers.

The governor also complained about the measure's plan to resolve contract-negotiation impasses with binding arbitration. 

Hopes for ending the budget stalemate faded even further this week when Gov. Bruce Rauner's office interrupted a news conference called by Senate President John Cullerton.

Cullerton, a Democrat, began by telling reporters that Rauner's budget was unbalanced when it was introduced. But then Cullerton appeared to offer an olive branch, according to Illinois Public Radio's Amanda Vinicky. In front of reporters, he asked the Governor to start over on the budget.

Court Vacates Cook County Ruling On State Paychecks

Jul 17, 2015
state of Illinois

Illinois Comptroller Leslie Munger on Friday praised the First District Appellate Court's decision to vacate the Cook County Circuit Court order to pay certain state employees at federal minimum wage while denying paychecks to others.

"Today's ruling removes any conflict between court decisions and allows my office to continue paying all state employees for their work," she said in a statement. "My priority has consistently been to comply with federal mandates and do everything in my power under the law to pay workers for services they are already providing the state.

Brian Mackey / Illinois Public Radio

A Cook County judge has ruled Illinois may not continue to pay state workers in full during an ongoing budget impasse. Now the state comptroller says she will appeal the decision.

illinois.gov

Illinois leaders aren't in agreement on a new state budget, even as the current one nears its July expiration date. Democrats passed their own version, but Governor Bruce Rauner can't act on most of it yet, even if he wants to.

Just a few of the budget bills Democrats passed have made it to Gov. Rauner's desk. He has the ability to sign them into law, reject them entirely, or cut down the levels of spending.

The rest are still on hold.

Senate President John Cullerton says Democrats did that for a reason.

Emanuel Talks Trust With Springfield

Jun 16, 2015
cityofchicago.org

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says the main players in Springfield should cool out.

His comments come as Republican Governor Bruce Rauner started an ad campaign criticizing Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan.

Emanuel says those commercials could make it harder to break a stalemate.

“In politics, dialogue and trust are essential and any time you break that up, you make coming to terms harder," Emanuel said.

There’s a movement to balance the state’s budget by bringing in more revenue instead of cutting programs. Tuesday night, local school superintendents were joined by other community leaders at a forum at Rock Valley College to hear plans on how  to “break the budget gridlock.”

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Expect the state to be nine billion dollars behind in paying its bills by the end of the year. That was the grim message State Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka had for a gathering of not-for-profit agencies Monday at Rockford University. She’s enlisting their help to find ways to ease the financial pressure on groups that depend on state money to serve their clients. 

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

An Illinois judge is citing "safety concerns" in his order keeping Governor Pat Quinn from moving forward with plans to close two Illinois prisons.