state budget

The financial struggle isn’t over for the organizations that provide social services to people in need in Illinois.

There are still a lot of questions about the stopgap budget passed by lawmakers, according to Paul Logli. He’s the president and CEO of United Way of Rock River Valley. Logli says providers have heard from a number of state agencies that they have 18-month contracts that expire January 1st.

Gov. Bruce Rauner says he doesn't want to call the General Assembly into special session for votes on a budget even though there are just 10 days left in the fiscal year.

The Republican told reporters Tuesday that special sessions in the recent past have produced only hotter tempers.

Rauner says he'll "evaluate options" in the coming days to avoid the shutdown of ongoing projects and delays to the opening of public schools.

Winnebago County Bar Association

Illinois is approaching a new fiscal year without a state budget. The head of an organization that helps fund social service agencies says citizens need to demand more from their lawmakers. 

Paul Logli is president and CEO of United Way of Rock River Valley. He told the crowd at the Rockford Urban Ministries annual meeting Friday that no matter where they stand politically, they have to be unforgiving of ALL state lawmakers about the budget impasse.

Illinois Lottery

Illinois Lottery officials say they support a short-term budget proposed by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner because it would pay lottery winners.

The state of Illinois remains without a budget after Rauner and Democratic leaders couldn't come to an agreement. Last year lottery winners sued when the state withheld winnings because of lack of a budget.

A patchwork plan allowed lottery winners to eventually be paid but it expires June 30, the end of the budget year.

Flickr user / alamosbasement "old school" (CC BY 2.0)

More than a dozen school superintendents have written a letter to Republican Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner accusing him of playing politics with education funding.

School leaders including from Chicago, Peoria and East Moline sent the letter Monday to Rauner. They say schools won't open on time and call Illinois' funding formula the nation's most "regressive." 

They also claim stand-alone school funding bills Republicans introduced at session's end continue unequal spending.