State Employees

Attorney General Lisa Madigan argued in court Tuesday that paying state employees removes “any imperative” for Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner and the General Assembly to “fulfill their basic constitutional obligations ... and resolve their budget impasse.”

Madigan is trying to halt state employee paychecks. She said only the General Assembly can approve state spending, which means Illinois does not have the legal authority to make payroll.

Jenna Dooley / WNIJ

The cases involve two groups: one which has been getting paid; and another which hasn’t, but wants to.

Today's case before the appellate court in Mount Vernon, involves state employees. Lawyers from Attorney General Lisa Madigan’s office are arguing against a ruling that said these workers must be paid. 

Normally, their salaries must be appropriated by the legislature; when that didn’t happen in 2015, the AFSCME union convinced a judge to order that the payments be made.

"Electronic Stethescope" By Flickr User Ted Eytan / (CC BY 2.0)

Gov. Bruce Rauner has rescinded his notice to lay off 124 unionized nurses at the Illinois Department of Corrections and move the jobs to a private contractor.

State Rep. Tim Butler of Springfield says it was he and six other Republicans who got the governor to return to the bargaining table.

“I think it’s best for those nurses in that situation that they continue to be state employees,” Butler said. "I mean that’s what we’re advocating for."

WUIS

The failure to pass a real budget is driving up the cost of Illinois government. The state hasn’t been paying its bills for employee health care — and interest penalties now exceed $500 million dollars.

It’s no secret credit card companies make their money when people don’t pay their bills in full. Those interest rates cause even a modest bill to grow quickly.

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's administration has filed a lawsuit over the way Illinois' comptroller is handling employee pay.

The lawsuit filed Monday in St. Clair County Circuit Court says Democratic Comptroller Susana Mendoza is violating a 2015 court order.

The lawsuit contends the paychecks of 587 Central Management Services employees could be disrupted if the matter is not resolved by Wednesday.

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