State Employees

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's administration has filed a lawsuit over the way Illinois' comptroller is handling employee pay.

The lawsuit filed Monday in St. Clair County Circuit Court says Democratic Comptroller Susana Mendoza is violating a 2015 court order.

The lawsuit contends the paychecks of 587 Central Management Services employees could be disrupted if the matter is not resolved by Wednesday.

"Money" by Flickr User 401(K) 2012 / (CC X 2.0)

Illinois lawmakers are preparing legislation to ensure that state employees continue receiving paychecks if a judge agrees with the attorney general's argument that their pay should be halted during the budget impasse.

Republican Rep. Avery Bourne and Democratic Rep. Sue Scherer introduced similar measures Wednesday to keep paychecks flowing in response to a motion filed by Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan last week.

Madigan is asking a judge to reverse a previous ruling that not paying state workers would be unconstitutional, even without a budget.

Comptroller Susana Mendoza says state employees promised bonuses will now have to wait to receive them during the ongoing budget impasse.

The office that controls Illinois' checkbook announced Wednesday that payments to social services and public safety come first.  

Mendoza, a Democrat, took office this week after ousting Republican Leslie Munger in a special election.

The issue of bonuses emerged during the campaign. In October, Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's office announced merit bonuses for over 1,000 non-union workers totaling up to $4 million.

WUIS

Illinois's high court has been asked to decide once and for all whether Illinois can pay government workers when there's no state budget.

Despite the budget impasse, state employees are getting their paychecks for July. The Comptroller's office says that's thanks to a decision from a St. Clair County judge.

But a Cook County judge had the opposite take, and ruled that without a budget, Illinois loses authority to pay all workers.

Illinois Public Radio

The legal dispute continues this week over what Illinois state workers should be paid.

It’s the latest issue to be caught in the wide-ranging web of consequences resulting from having no state budget.

While dozens of human service providers are left hanging in the wind -- unsure what kind of state support they’ll get -- state employees find themselves in a similar boat. Last week, a Cook County judge said employees shouldn’t get a salary since the state doesn’t have a spending plan.

An appeal to that ruling is quickly moving forward.

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