State Employees

Comptroller Susana Mendoza says state employees promised bonuses will now have to wait to receive them during the ongoing budget impasse.

The office that controls Illinois' checkbook announced Wednesday that payments to social services and public safety come first.  

Mendoza, a Democrat, took office this week after ousting Republican Leslie Munger in a special election.

The issue of bonuses emerged during the campaign. In October, Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's office announced merit bonuses for over 1,000 non-union workers totaling up to $4 million.

WUIS

Illinois's high court has been asked to decide once and for all whether Illinois can pay government workers when there's no state budget.

Despite the budget impasse, state employees are getting their paychecks for July. The Comptroller's office says that's thanks to a decision from a St. Clair County judge.

But a Cook County judge had the opposite take, and ruled that without a budget, Illinois loses authority to pay all workers.

Illinois Public Radio

The legal dispute continues this week over what Illinois state workers should be paid.

It’s the latest issue to be caught in the wide-ranging web of consequences resulting from having no state budget.

While dozens of human service providers are left hanging in the wind -- unsure what kind of state support they’ll get -- state employees find themselves in a similar boat. Last week, a Cook County judge said employees shouldn’t get a salary since the state doesn’t have a spending plan.

An appeal to that ruling is quickly moving forward.

Flickr user Daniel Borman / "Money, Money, Money" (CC BY 2.0)

Several attorneys are vowing to appeal a judge’s decision that would force the state to pay Illinois workers minimum wage instead of their normal salary.

A Cook County judge ruled that if state lawmakers can’t agree on a spending plan - then the person who signs the paychecks lacks the authority to do her job.

That would be Comptroller Leslie Munger, and her office is appealing the ruling.

The agency that processes pay says it’ll take up to a year to change all the employees’ salaries in the state’s outdated computer accounting systems.

Brian Mackey

A legal battle over union fees is brewing in Illinois between the Republican governor and Democratic attorney general.

Attorney General Lisa Madigan says Gov. Bruce Rauner had no authority to bring a fight over union dues to federal court. She's trying to dismiss the case.

Rauner is trying to get rid of so-called "fair share" dues on two fronts: Earlier this year, he ordered state agencies to stop collecting them, and he's suing in federal court to toss out the underlying state law that requires them.

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