state shutdown

Flickr user 401(K) 2012 / "Money" (CC v. 2.0)

State employees can expect to get paychecks through July. That's for work performed before the new fiscal year began.

After that, will they get paid if a budget impasse continues? A court hearing this morning could help decide.

Talk to Illinois' Attorney General, Lisa Madigan, a Democrat, and it sounds simple. Without a budget, Illinois has lost much of its authority to spend money.

"In order for all employees to be paid their full amount of pay, a budget needs to be passed by the legislature and approved by the governor,” Madigan said.

NIU Today

Northern Illinois University may not be directly affected by Illinois's lack of a budget -- not yet, at least.

NIU is not planning to take away student perks, but Capital Projects at the university, like construction for the Stevens Building, would be halted. About 100 other Capital Projects would also be affected.

Al Phillips is the NIU Vice President of Finance and Administration. He went to Springfield Wednesday to plead NIU's financial case, along with other representatives from other state schools.

Flickr user Daniel Borman / "Money, Money, Money" (CC BY 2.0)

Doctors who care for patients on Medicaid, drug treatment counselors and probation officers could all go without pay because Illinois is without a new budget. 

But elected officials will keep getting their paychecks.

Without a budget, Illinois loses its spending authority. Much of it anyway. Some spending is built in, automatic: like paying off debt, sending municipalities their cut of the income tax and lawmakers' pay.

Brian Mackey / Illinois Public Radio

Illinois legislators return to Springfield Tuesday, leaving them one last day to get a budget deal in order. This year's spending plan expires at midnight on June 30. 

Not only is there no long-term agreement, but there's no sign of a provisional one, either.

Democrats say they did their part: they passed a spending plan before the end of May, when the legislative session was originally scheduled to end. But last week Gov. Bruce Rauner rejected nearly all of it, citing that it was nearly $4 billion out of balance. 

ilga.gov

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner’s rejection of a spending plan gives Illinois lawmakers just five days to find an agreement -- and avoid a government shutdown.

But an event on Chicago’s West Side shed some light into just how far apart things remain between Rauner and Democratic legislators.

You’ve probably heard about the increasing tensions between Rauner and Democrats. And in that time, the voice and tone of Rauner’s opposition maybe hasn’t been all that dramatic.

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