Wisconsin

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The recount of Wisconsin's presidential election vote is nearly finished.

State election officials announced Friday that 89 percent of total ballots cast for president have been counted and 60 of the state's 72 counties had finished their work.

So far, Democrat Hillary Clinton has gained 49 votes on Republican Donald Trump, who defeated Clinton by more than 22,000 votes in the state.

The recount began Dec. 1. A federal judge on Friday refused to grant Trump supporters' request to halt the recount, saying it was nearly complete and likely won't change the results.

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The Green County clerk in Wisconsin says working nights and weekends are in his immediate future. That’s due to the ballot recount requested for the state by one presidential nominee.

About 19,000 ballots total were cast in Green County for the general election earlier this month. That’s according to Green County County Clerk Michael Doyle.

“We’ve got, like, 3,000 absentee ballots," Doyle said. "That really makes it very difficult for a recount because all of the ballot envelopes have to be certified and it just takes a lot more time.”

The Wisconsin Department of Justice is trying to convince a judge not to order a hand recount of presidential ballots.

Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein has requested a recount, saying she's worried results were hacked.

State election officials plan to start the recount today but have rejected Stein's supplemental request that the recount be conducted exclusively by hand.

Stein has filed a lawsuit asking a Madison judge to order a hand recount.

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Fewer than 20 percent of the provisional ballots cast in the election two weeks ago by voters who didn't have the required photo ID were counted.

The preliminary tally comes Tuesday from the Wisconsin Elections Commission.

The commission says there were at least 750 provisional ballots cast in the Nov. 8 election and of those 618 were issued because the voter didn't have an acceptable photo ID.

Only 116 out of the 618 provisional ballots were counted. Most of them, 399, were marked as "deadline expired," which indicates they weren't counted.

host.madison.com

A federal court says voting districts drawn by Wisconsin Republicans are unconstitutional.

The ruling issued Monday is a major victory for Democrats who have been in the minority for six years and lost ground in this year's election.

A three-judge panel tossed maps drawn by Republican lawmakers five years ago, saying they violate the voting rights of Democrats.

The maps divide Wisconsin into 99 Assembly and 33 Senate districts. A dozen voters sued last year, arguing that the boundaries discriminated against Democrats by diluting their voting power.

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