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A judge has ruled that even though Illinois doesn't have a budget, Comptroller Susana Mendoza must pay lawmakers.

In ruling in favor of Illinois legislators, the judge on Thursday cited a 2014 law passed after then-Gov. Pat Quinn withheld paychecks over pension reform.

A group of Democratic lawmakers last year filed a lawsuit against then-state Comptroller Leslie Munger, arguing she and Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner were holding up legislators' paychecks for political leverage.

"Blake Wilbur Building - Stanford Hospital & Clinics" by Flickr User Jennifer Morrow / (CC X 2.0)

The Illinois Supreme Court has vacated a lower court's ruling that found unconstitutional a state law allowing not-for-profit hospitals to avoid paying property taxes in certain cases.

The court decided unanimously Thursday to vacate a ruling last year by the Illinois 4th District Appellate Court because it lacked jurisdiction and remanded the case involving an Urbana hospital to the trial court for reconsideration.

mikefrerichs.com

  Illinois State Treasurer Mike Frerichs says he’s frustrated with the Trump Administration’s lack of transparency on medical marijuana.

 

The Champaign Democrat says he’s written the president twice since US Attorney General Jeff Sessions called the drug ‘dangerous.’ However, the AG didn't clarify if he was referring to medicinal or recreational use of cannabis.

 

 

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Rockford residents who are getting their health insurance through the Illinois exchange under the current Affordable Care Act will lose an estimated average of $3,662 in subsidies under the proposed replacement American Health Care Act.

That’s a drop of more than 42 percent.

Moreover, Rockford would be the hardest-hit by the changes – and residents in only two other Illinois cities would see their subsidies shrink.

Janie Wilson Cook

Former Rockford State Senator Joyce Holmberg died this week at the age of 86.

Holmberg was first elected to the State Senate in 1982 but had been very involved in the Democratic Party for decades. She was urged to run for what was dubbed “The Woman’s Seat” by Vivian Hickey, who had also served as Senator in the 34th District.  

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