Living On Earth

Living on Earth is the weekly environmental news and information program with news, features, interviews and commentary on a broad range of ecological issues.

Here and Now

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Friday Night Blues

Get your weekend off to a rousing start when you join host Harold Brown for a three-hour mix of the best traditional and contemporary blues.

The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

'The Sense Of An Ending' By Julian Barnes Awarded Booker Prize

Julian Barnes is the author of Metroland, Flaubert's Parrot and England, England.

Alan Edwards Knopf

Judges announced that Julian Barnes' The Sense Of An Ending was awarded the 2011 Man Booker Prize. The Leicester-born Barnes was a Booker finalist three times before: in 1984 for his novel Flaubert's Parrot; in 1998 for England, England and in 2005 for Arthur and George

The AP reports:

Judges announced the winner of the 50,000 pound ($82,000) prize Tuesday at a ceremony in London.

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Fresh Air

Fresh Air opens the window on contemporary arts and issues with guests from worlds as diverse as literature and economics.  Terry Gross hosts this multi-award-winning daily interview and features program.  The veteran public radio interviewer is known for her extraordinary ability to engage guests of all dispositions.  Each Monday through Thursday, she delights intelligent and curious listeners with revelations on contemporary societal concerns.

Award-winning journalist Patti Neighmond is NPR's health policy correspondent. Her reports air regularly on NPR newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Based in Los Angeles, Neighmond has covered health care policy since April 1987. She joined NPR's staff in 1981, covering local New York City news as well as the United Nations. In 1984, she became a producer for NPR's science unit and specialized in science and environmental issues.

It's All Politics
3:41 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

What Word Comes To Mind When You Think Of The GOP Candidates?

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 4:17 pm

How to explain Herman Cain's ascent among Republican presidential candidates?

Perhaps a partial reason is that he so far evokes more positive than negative responses among Republicans and GOP leaning independents in a Pew Research Center/Washington Post survey than two other highly touted candidates in the race, Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:35 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

When It Comes To Baby's Crib, Experts Say Go Bare Bones

A pediatrician says parents often mistakenly believe all baby accessories are safe.

iStockphoto.com

No more blankets in the baby's bed. Not even when it's cold outside. No bumpers, pillows, or toys. All these accoutrements are hazards for newborns and infants, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, which has released new expanded guidelines for reducing deaths from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS, and other causes including suffocation, entrapment and asphyxia.

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Fine Art
3:34 pm
Tue October 18, 2011

New Paintings Reignite The Bob Dylan Copycat Debate

The Asia Series is Bob Dylan's first exhibit in New York.

William Claxton AP

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 7:23 pm

Legendary songwriter Bob Dylan is once again at the center of a controversy about plagiarism, but this time it's not about his words or his music — it's about his painting.

The Asia Series, Dylan's current one-man show at the Gagosian Gallery in New York, was initially billed as the musician's visual response to his travels through Asia. But as it turns out, many of the pictures are direct copies from historical photographs.

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Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Obama Administration, with a special emphasis on economic issues.

The 2012 campaign is the third presidential contest Horsley has covered for NPR. He previously reported on Senator John McCain's White House bid in 2008 and Senator John Kerry's campaign in 2004. Thanks to this experience, Horsley has become an expert in the motel shampoo offerings of various battleground states.

Horsley took up the White House beat after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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