Associated Press

A Cook County judge has ordered Illinois to add post-traumatic stress disorder to the list of diseases eligible for medical marijuana treatment in a case filed by a military veteran.

Judge Neil Cohen on Tuesday ordered the Department of Public Health's director to add PTSD within 30 days.

The sternly worded ruling says Director Nirav Shah "engaged in a private investigation, hidden from public view" that was "constitutionally inappropriate."

Flickr user Jim Bowen / "Illinois State Capitol" (CC BY 2.0)

Illinois' governor has invited the legislative leaders to a meeting early this evening at the capitol.

It'll be an opportunity for them to hash out budget options ahead of the legislature's return to Springfield tomorrow.

Chances for a bipartisan agreement remain grim as ever. 

GOP Gov. Bruce Rauner and the Democrats who control the General Assembly have gone a year without agreeing on a budget.

The pressure to at least pass something, like a temporary state budget and money for schools, is intense.

A spokeswoman for Gov. Bruce Rauner says the Illinois medical marijuana program's director has resigned.

Spokeswoman Catherine Kelly tells The Associated Press the administration has accepted the resignation of Joseph Wright, who was in the position for just over one year. She says the governor's office "will have no further comment."

Wright will be replaced by Jack Campbell, the program's bureau chief in the Department of Agriculture.

illinoisstate.edu

A judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed against three retired central Illinois police officers by a man wrongfully convicted of a 1993 murder.

Douglas County Judge Richard Broch Jr. on Friday dismissed the lawsuit filed by Alan Beaman seeking $50,000 from retired Normal officers Tim Freesmeyer, Dave Warner and Frank Zayas and the city of Normal.

Beaman served 13 years in prison in the death of Illinois State University student Jennifer Lockmiller before DNA evidence pointed to other suspects.

The Illinois Supreme Court vacated his conviction in 2009.

Jenna Dooley / WNIJ

A week from today is a shameful anniversary for Illinois. It will mean the state has gone a full year without a complete budget.

          

Bruce Rauner has been at the state's helm since last January -- which means he'll be governor for at least another two and a half years.

Back in May, Democratic State Representative Lou Lang remarked:

“…That it was entirely possible that there would not be an agreed budget during the entire four years of Bruce Rauner's governorship."

www.cyberdriveillinois.com

The Illinois Secretary of State's decision not to send license plate renewal reminders has earned the state more than twice the amount of late fees so far this year compared to last year.

The Belleville News-Democrat reports that so far this year the state has collected $9.5 million in late license plate fees, compared with $4.3 million during the same period last year.

Illinois Secretary of State's spokesman Dave Druker says there have been about 476,550 late fees collected so far this year compared with about 214,500 during the same time last year.

"Window" By Flickr User Sam Howzit / (CC BY 2.0)

A new survey of Illinois human service providers shows nearly two-thirds have cut programs because of the state budget standoff, leaving almost 1 million people without services.

The United Way of Illinois released results Wednesday of a survey of 429 agencies that have contracts with the state. Illinois owes those waiting to be paid an average of $525,000.

The percentage of agencies that have made cuts was up from 48 percent in January.

Wikipedia

A judge in Chicago has agreed to release former U.S. Rep. Mel Reynolds from jail as he awaits trial on misdemeanor tax charges.

Thursday's ruling requires the Illinois Democrat to wear an electronic-monitoring device so authorities can keep tabs on him.

Reynolds is accused of failing to file tax returns from 2009 to 2012. He was jailed in April after violating bond conditions when traveling in Africa.

Gov. Bruce Rauner says he doesn't want to call the General Assembly into special session for votes on a budget even though there are just 10 days left in the fiscal year.

The Republican told reporters Tuesday that special sessions in the recent past have produced only hotter tempers.

Rauner says he'll "evaluate options" in the coming days to avoid the shutdown of ongoing projects and delays to the opening of public schools.

"Dennis Hastert 109th pictorial photo" by United States Congress

Dennis Hastert's attorney says the former U.S. House speaker will report to a federal prison in southeastern Minnesota this week to begin serving a 15-month sentence in his hush-money case.

Washington, D.C.,-based attorney Thomas Green confirmed Monday in an email that the Illinois Republican will report to the Rochester Federal Medical Center.

Hastert has a Wednesday afternoon deadline to report. 

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