Associated Press

Chicago Police Department

Five Cook County Jail inmates who applauded as the man charged with the fatal shooting of a Chicago police commander was led by their cell could face reprisals for their actions.

  

The incident happened Thursday after suspect Shomari Legghette appeared in court on first-degree murder charges in the Tuesday slaying of Commander Paul Bauer.

scottdrury.org

An appellate court has ruled that Democratic attorney general candidate Scott Drury can remain on ballots for the March 20 primary.

The court ruled Friday. A judge had previously determined that the state legislator running for statewide office couldn't be on the ballot over paperwork issues. Drury immediately appealed.

The case is one reason that early voting has been delayed in parts of the state with election officials awaiting a final decision before they print ballots. 

CREDIT CHICAGO POLICE DEPARTMENT

A judge has denied bond for a man with a long criminal history who is charged in the fatal shooting of a Chicago police commander.

 

A Cook County courtroom was filled with police officers at 44-year-old Shomari Legghette's hearing Thursday, including Superintendent Eddie Johnson. Legghette wore sweatpants and a Chicago Bears shirt along with shackles around his wrist and ankles. Legghette is charged with first-degree murder, felon in possession of a firearm and possession of narcotics in the death of Cmdr. Paul Bauer.

http://legis.wisconsin.gov/senate/04/taylor

Members of the Wisconsin State Assembly's Black and Latino Caucus say their state is the worst place in the nation to raise a black child. 

The lawmakers made the remarks Monday at the first State of Black and Brown Wisconsin address in the state Capitol. Democratic Sens. Lena Taylor and LaTonya Johnson, both from Milwaukee, began the address by declaring that Wisconsin is the worst place to raise black children due to economic and health disparities between blacks and whites. 

State of Illinois

The Illinois Department of Public Health has appealed a decision adding severe pain as a qualifying condition for medical marijuana.

The paperwork filed Thursday in Cook County comes weeks after a judge ordered “intractable pain,'' or severe and constant pain with no cure, be added to over 40 qualifying medical conditions.

The ruling stems from a lawsuit from 58-year-old Ann Mednick of Rolling Meadows. She argues medical marijuana would help treat pain related to osteoarthritis without her having to use opioids for treatment. 

Pages