Associated Press

U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel are among the Illinois politicians criticizing President Donald Trump's decision to bar transgender people from serving in the military.

Duckworth is an Iraq War veteran who lost both legs after her helicopter was shot down in 2004. The Democratic senator said Wednesday that she "didn't care if the American troops risking their lives to help save me were gay, straight, transgender or anything else." She said the policy is "counterproductive to our national security."

illinois.gov

An auction of unclaimed property worth $113,500 at the Illinois State Fair will be previewed in coming weeks in Springfield and Chicago.

State Treasurer Michael Frerichs says items include a signed, 1983 Ryne Sandberg baseball card; souvenir medallions from the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago; a Hohner 6-sided "paddle wheel" harmonica; and coins from the 1622 Spanish shipwreck of the Atocha .

A major credit agency raised debt ratings and affirmed others for seven Illinois universities in response to the state finally passing an annual budget.

S&P Global Ratings raised its debt ratings for Southern Illinois University, Governors State University, Northeastern Illinois University and Eastern Illinois University. It also affirmed ratings for the University of Illinois, Illinois State University and Western Illinois University.

"help wanted" by Flickr User Alachua County / (CC X 2.0)

The Illinois unemployment rate increased slightly in June while nonfarm payrolls increased by nearly 9,000 jobs.

The Illinois Department of Employment Security reported the preliminary data Thursday from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Unemployment inched up 0.1 percentage point in June to settle at 4.7 percent.

Employment Security Director Jeff Mays also revised May job-growth numbers up sharply. They were reported at just over 11,000 new jobs rather than 2,400 as earlier reported.

"Courtroom One Gavel" by Flickr User Beth Cortez-Neavel / (CC BY 2.0)

 A coalition of social-service providers owed money by Illinois state government is seeking more time to appeal its lawsuit to the Illinois Supreme Court.

Andrea Durbin, chairwoman of Pay Now Illinois, said that Thursday was the deadline to appeal a lawsuit against the state to the high court. But the coalition petitioned to postpone the deadline to Sept. 30.

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