Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Pages

The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

New U.S. Rules Protect Giant Bluefin Tuna

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 5:32 pm

In an effort to reduce the number of giant bluefin tuna killed by fishing fleets, the U.S. is putting out new rules about commercial fishing in the Gulf of Mexico and parts of the western Atlantic. The rules have special protections for giant bluefin — fish that have grown to 81 inches or more.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Tue September 2, 2014

Celebrity Photo Leak Puts Spotlight On The Cloud, And Security

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 3:09 pm

The FBI and Apple are looking into how private photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other celebrities were stolen, in an apparent breach of security that is raising new questions about storing personal information online.

"This is a flagrant violation of privacy," Lawrence's spokeswoman said Sunday, after nude images of the actress and others began to emerge online. Some of the celebrities have denied the photos are of them; others, such as Mary Elizabeth Winstead, say they deleted the images long ago.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:48 am
Tue September 2, 2014

After Just Two Years, Huge Atlantic City Casino Shuts Down

A woman gathers shells along the ocean near the Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, N.J., early Tuesday. The casino resort has closed, a little over two years after opening with the promise of helping to renew Atlantic City.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Tue September 2, 2014 11:24 am

After operating for only two years, the Revel Casino Hotel has closed down, part of a trend that will reportedly shutter a third of Atlantic City's big gambling halls by the end of September. It cost $2.4 billion to build the Revel facility.

"It's a tragedy," massage therapist Lori Bacum, who worked at the resort's spa, tells NJ.com. "There were some warnings, but none of us thought it would happen. We felt so safe, because this was the place that was going to take (the city) to a new level."

Read more
The Two-Way
1:02 pm
Fri August 22, 2014

'More That Could Have Been Done' To Help Foley, His Brother Says

Faulting the U.S. approach to dealing with hostage situations, Michael Foley says more could have been done to free his brother, American journalist James Foley, who was beheaded by extremist group the Islamic State after being held captive since 2012.

From Yahoo News:

Read more
The Two-Way
11:11 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Coming Soon To A Pole Near You: A Bike That Locks Itself

On a bike made by Yerka, parts of the frame hinge open to form a locking bracket. Its designers say the bike can't be ridden if it's stolen.
Yerka

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 11:52 am

Cyclists may soon have a convenient way to discourage bike thieves, thanks to new designs that use parts of the bikes themselves as locks. Two projects — one based in Chile, another in Seattle — are promising to provide peace of mind without the fuss of carrying a separate lock.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:09 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Who Owns A Monkey's Selfie? No One Can, U.S. Says

This 2011 image taken by a crested black macaque in Indonesia has ignited a debate over who owns the photo. The camera's owner says the image belongs to him. In its new manual, the U.S. Copyright Office disagrees.
David J Slater Caters News Agency/Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 11:48 am

The question of who owns a striking image taken by a crested black macaque may be closer to being settled, as the U.S. Copyright Office says the photo can't be copyrighted — by the person who owns the camera or by any other entity — because it wasn't taken by a human.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:50 am
Fri August 22, 2014

Hamas Executes Suspected Informants After Deadly Israeli Strike

Palestinian mourners carry the body of three senior commanders of the Hamas military wing in the southern Gaza Strip on Thursday, after they were killed in an Israeli airstrike. Hamas executed more than a dozen people it says were spying for Israel.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 2:27 pm

Updated at 3:25 p.m. ET

One day after an Israeli airstrike killed three of its senior military leaders, Hamas says it has executed more than a dozen people in the Gaza Strip, after concluding that they had been spying for Israel.

A four-year-old Israeli boy was also reportedly killed in a mortar attack near the Gaza border.

From Jerusalem, NPR's Jackie Northam reports:

"Hamas confirmed that there were two separate rounds of executions in Gaza for people suspected of collaborating with Israel.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:49 am
Fri August 22, 2014

U.S. Prisoner Swap For Bergdahl Broke The Law, GAO Says

When it carried out a tense prisoner exchange in May, the Pentagon misused nearly $1 million, the Government Accountability Office says. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was taken out of captivity in Afghanistan, as seen in this image from video obtained from the Voice Of Jihad Website.
AP

The Pentagon didn't give enough notice to Congress and misused nearly $1 million when it swapped Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five senior Taliban members, the Government Accountability Office says. The nonpartisan agency's findings led Defense officials to say they had to act quickly to free Bergdahl, who had been held for five years.

GAO investigators looked into the incident at the request of several Republican senators, including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and members of the Appropriations Committee.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:59 am
Thu August 21, 2014

U.S. Won't Rule Out Attack In Syria To Hit Islamic State

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 11:53 am

American aircraft have carried out more strikes against the Islamic State, after the extremist group beheaded U.S. journalist James Foley. The attacks come despite threats to kill other hostages; a White House official says the U.S. could also target areas in Syria, if warranted.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:15 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Hamas Says Israeli Airstrike Killed 3 Senior Commanders

Hamas supporters carry the body of one of three Hamas senior commanders killed Thursday by an airstrike in the Gaza Strip.
Thomas Coex AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 7:48 pm

An Israeli attack on a house has killed three military commanders in Gaza, Hamas says, including one of the group's most senior leaders. Thursday's strike follows what Hamas says was a failed attack on its top military leader earlier this week.

From Gaza, NPR's Philip Reeves reports:

"The attack happened overnight and targeted a residential house in Rafah close to Gaza's border with Egypt.

Read more

Pages