Guy Stephens

WNIJ Here and Now Host

Guy Stephens is the local host for NPR's Here and Now on WNIJ.  He also produces news stories for the station, and coordinates our online events calendar, PSAs and Arts Calendar announcements.  In each of these ways, Guy helps keep our listening community informed about what's going on, whether on a national or local level.  Guy's degrees are in music, and he spent a number of years as a classical host on WNIU.  In fact, after nearly 20 years with Northern Public Radio, the best description of his job may be "other duties as required."

UW Health, University of Wisconsin--Madison

Rockford’s SwedishAmerican Hospital will not be affected by cuts announced by its parent network. 

Madison-based UW Health announced Thursday that it will try to improve its balance sheet by $80 million over the next 18 months through cuts or added revenue. 

Guy Stephens/WNIJ

The City of DeKalb has begun a project to revitalize a troubled area of the city. In the past, “renewal” often meant “removal and replacement,” but not these days. WNIJ’s Guy Stephens looks at recent efforts toward neighborhood revitalization.

  Guy Stephens' report on neighborhood revitalization (Friday Forum, Dec. 1, 2017)

churchjazz.com

The Christmas story has been told in many ways. And many kinds of music have been used to help tell that story anew. One such piece, billed as “A Jazz Nativity,” will bring its interpretation to northern Illinois this weekend.

givingtuesday.org

‘Tis the season. Black Friday, Cyber Monday - sales now seem to stretch over weeks, if not months.  On Tuesday, Nov. 28, though, people are invited to hit the pause button on their shopping.  Instead, they’re being asked to give their dollars to charity.  

Shopping has become something of a tradition after the Thanksgiving holiday in America.  In 2012, two nonprofit organizations in New York City wanted to celebrate another great American tradition, giving to charity.

Pretzel City Kitchens will be open for free tours as part of an event at Wagner House.

The project to create a certified, commercial grade kitchen that would be open for community use began in earnest several years ago. Now, after much grant-seeking and traversing several hurdles, it’s almost ready to open for business.

Freeport City Manager Lowell Crow says Pretzel City Kitchens is an important part of the city’s hope for the future.

 

 

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