Jenna Dooley

Reporter, News Production Supervisor

Jenna Dooley has spent her professional career in public radio. She is a graduate of Northern Illinois University and the Public Affairs Reporting Program at the University of Illinois - Springfield. She returned to Northern Public Radio in DeKalb after several years hosting Morning Edition at WUIS-FM in Springfield.  She is a former "Newsfinder of the Year" from the Illinois Associated Press and recipient of NIU's Donald R. Grubb Journalism Alumni Award. She is an active member of the Illinois News Broadcasters Association and an adjunct instructor at NIU.

Jessi LaRue

When it comes to innovation, we remember the name that came out on top – no matter how good the “other” product was.

Cyrus McCormick gained fame for his wheat reaper, but few people remember John Manny.

When it comes to barbed wire, the name of Joseph Glidden springs to mind, along with his partner Isaac Ellwood. But not as many people are aware of the significance of Jacob Haish in the industry.

Jenna Dooley

A Northern Illinois University student created a website that maps out Illinois health care providers for immigrants, regardless of their status. Yosue Perez, an accounting major from Hanover Park, completed the project through the school's Summer Research Opportunities Program.

He says he has a personal interest in the topic.

Carl Nelson

She's not sure how long she'll be in the office, but NIU Acting President Lisa Freeman says there's plenty to accomplish. Among her priorities are providing employee raises and zeroing in on the latest student recruiting tactics.

To-do list for temporary role

Austin Hansen

For the first time in the school's history, first-year medical students will live and learn in Rockford.

The first class to arrive on campus in 1972 came to the city as second-year students, completing their initial training at the University of Illinois College of Medicine campus in Urbana.

Alex Stagnaro-Green is the regional dean for the college. He says students will now be able to complete all four years of medical school in Rockford.

Jenna Dooley

A group of volunteers is trying to clean up one of Illinois’s busiest tourist spots.

Six-year-old Leo Mancuso of Oswego enjoys Starved Rock State Park the same ways many visitors do -- jumping across small streams and gazing up at monstrous rocks. But there’s another side to the popular tourist spot: trash.

“I found a water bottle, a big one,” he explained.

It’s no surprise to his mother, Becky Mancuso, who brought along a large trash bag for this hike.