Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Given a deal to end to a nine-month slowdown at West Coast ports announced on Friday, we thought now might be the time to promote this new-to-us video from FleetMon.com that gives us a strong representation of just how busy are the world's shipping lanes.

A federal judge has ruled to temporarily block an Obama administration order to detain mothers and children seeking asylum in the U.S., what is known as the "no-release" policy.

The Wall Street Journal says: "The lawsuit challenged the new practice by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a unit of the Department of Homeland Security, of detaining women and children who had shown a credible fear of persecution."

A fire in one of the world's tallest residential skyscrapers in Dubai forced the evacuation of hundreds of people before it was safely extinguished with no deaths.

Local media reports that the blaze broke out in the 86-story Torch Tower at about 2:30 a.m. local time in the United Arab Emirates.

Newly confirmed Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, in a surprise visit to Afghanistan today, gave the strongest indication to date that the White House is considering slowing down its troop withdrawal timetable to accommodate security concerns.

Carter said Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and President Obama would get a chance to discuss a possible "rethinking" of plans for the exit of the remaining 10,000 U.S. forces when Ghani visits Washington next month.

For more than 500 million years, sea creatures have been getting bigger — much bigger as it turns out, according to a study by scientists who say that the evolutionary trend toward larger body size fits with a 19th-century principle known as Cope's rule.

The rule, first posited in the late 1800s by Edward Drinker Cope, "states that evolution tends to increase body size over geologic time in a lineage of populations."

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, speaking on the one-year anniversary of a bloody day of anti-government protests in Kiev that precipitated the ouster of his Moscow-backed predecessor, accuses Russia of having a direct role in the killing of dozens of activists.

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Russian-backed Ukrainian separatists continued to shell government positions in the country's contested east despite a truce agreement that went into effect nearly a week ago.

Meanwhile, a British parliamentary report published today accuses Europe's leaders and diplomats of a "catastrophic misreading" of the mood in the Kremlin ahead of the crisis that has plunged Ukraine into turmoil and threatened to re-draw the post-Cold War map in the region.

Thailand's parliament has given preliminary approval to a law that would make it illegal for women in the country to hire themselves out as surrogate mothers to would-be foreign parents. The legislation follows a series of high-profile scandals in the past year that have shed a negative light on the practice.

In what is being described as an unprecedented occurrence, Australia is getting slammed by two major cyclones at the same time.

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