Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

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Updated at 10:12 a.m. ET

Ousted Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont has ignored a court order to return to Spain to face charges of sedition, though several other ministers of his deposed government did appear in court for questioning Thursday.

Updated at 9:03 a.m. ET

A day after the deadly terrorist attack in New York City that killed at least eight people, President Trump said suspect Sayfullo Saipov should get the death penalty and that he would consider sending Saipov to Guantanamo Bay even though he has already been charged in civilian court.

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

Editor's note: This story includes explicit language describing alleged sexual assaults.

Actor Dustin Hoffman and director Brett Ratner are the latest Hollywood figures to be accused of sexual misconduct.

Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been heavily criticized for failing to stop ongoing violence against the country's Rohingya minority in western Rakhine state, visited the region for the first time since attacks there triggered a refugee crisis.

Suu Kyi arrived in the state capital of Sittwe before heading north, where many Rohingya villages are located, the government reported.

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