All Things Considered

Monday through Friday, 3pm - 7pm; Saturday and Sunday, 4pm - 5pm
Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world.  Every weekday afternoon, hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish bring listeners breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  WNIJ airs a one-hour edition of the program at 4pm on Saturday and Sunday.

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NPR Story
2:00 pm
Sun October 30, 2011

Assad Warns Against Outside Intervention

Syrian President Bashar Assad warned of an "earthquake" if any outside forces intervened in his country. Meanwhile, protesters say dozens of people were killed in the last few days, making this one of the bloodiest weekends since the uprising began.

NPR Story
2:00 pm
Sun October 30, 2011

Three-Minute Fiction

This round of Three-Minute Fiction attracted 3,400 original stories. NPR's Bob Mondello reads an excerpt from Sleep Lessons by Chad Woody from Springfield, Mo., and Susan Stamberg shares parts of The Edge by Andrew Morris from Andes, N.Y. To see these stories and others go to npr.org/threeminutefiction.

Author Interviews
1:41 pm
Sun October 30, 2011

From Mafia Soldier To Cocaine Cowboy

In 1986, Jon Roberts was arrested as part a cocaine bust that ultimately unraveled his empire.

Jon Roberts Crown Publishing Group

Jon Roberts was born into the Mafia.

His father, Nat Riccobono, and his uncles came to New York City from Sicily and made money by running shady businesses throughout New York in the late 1940s. After his father was deported and his mother died, Roberts moved from home to home until he was 16 and joined his uncles in the Mafia.

By the time Roberts was 26, in 1978, he was a practiced criminal — committing robberies and dealing cocaine in New York City; but he was getting bored. That's when he moved to Miami and started working with the Colombians, importing cocaine.

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Music Interviews
11:50 am
Sun October 30, 2011

The U.S. Army's Rock 'N' Roll Past

A rare photo of East of Underground in performance. The band formed while its members were stationed in Germany during the Vietnam War.

Courtesy of Now Again Records

The thought of army music evokes a certain tradition — say, trumpets and drums in the style of "Pershing's Own." But that tradition was set on its ear back in the late 1960s and early '70s, when the PFCs stationed overseas formed their own pop bands. And instead of breaking them up, Army brass sent them on tour.

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Space
3:13 pm
Sat October 29, 2011

Spy Satellite Engineer's Top Secret Is Revealed

Phil Pressel designed cameras for the government's top-secret Hexagon project. He's only recently been able to speak about his life's work.

Roger Guillemette/SPACE.com

Every day for decades, engineer Phil Pressel would come home from work and be unable to tell his wife what he'd been doing all day.

Now, Pressel is free to speak about his life's work: designing cameras for a top-secret U.S. government spy satellite. Officially known as the KH-9 Hexagon, engineers called it "Big Bird" for its massive size.

Until the government declassified it last month, Hexagon had been a secret for 46 years.

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Author Interviews
11:06 am
Sat October 29, 2011

The Funny 50: A Cavalcade Of Comic Writers

Mark Twain's story "A Presidential Candidate," in which he jokingly announces that he is running for president, kicks off Andy Borowitz's comedy collection.

Ernest H. Mills Getty Images

Writer and comedian Andy Borowitz says he initially got into comedy for one simple reason: girls.

In addition to using his jokes to charm women, Borowitz has also written for The New Yorker and runs a satirical blog called The Borowitz Report. His latest project is The 50 Funniest American Writers: An Anthology of Humor from Mark Twain to The Onion.

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Monkey See
11:01 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

Justin Timberlake On Music, Comedy, And Wearing Out His NPR T-Shirt

Justin Timberlake arrives at the premiere of In Time on October 20.

Frazer Harrison Getty Images

It was almost two years ago now that Justin Timberlake, while filming The Social Network, cemented his place in the NPR collective heart by being photographed wearing our logo across his chest like a tattoo, only fabric, and temporary, and less painful. (Back then, by the way, that shirt wasn't in our shop. Now, you can have one! It's with our "best-sellers," even now.)

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Planet Money
3:42 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

Why GDP Is Like GPA

Originally published on Thu May 31, 2012 9:53 am

GDP contains multitudes. Everything we manufacture. Every plumber who fixed a sink, every accountant who carried the one and divided by five — all the goods and services we produced.

It was invented by a guy named Simon Kuznets during the the Great Depression, when everybody wanted to know just how bad things were.

Now the number is put out by Steve Landefeld at the government's Bureau of Economic Analysis.

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NPR's Back-Seat Book Club
3:33 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

Kids' Book Club: A 'Graveyard' Tour With Neil Gaiman

Emily Davis for NPR

Originally published on Tue November 29, 2011 5:27 pm

Welcome to the first installment of NPR's Backseat Book Club! We've invited all of our younger listeners to join us for conversations with authors of kids' books. We kicked off the club with The Graveyard Book, a thrilling Halloween treat from Neil Gaiman that won the Newbery Medal in 2009. Gaiman loves Halloween and all the creepy fun that goes along with it.

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Opinion
2:45 pm
Fri October 28, 2011

For Witty, Warm, Wonderful Advice, We Asked Beth

istockphoto.com

Amy Dickinson writes the Ask Amy advice column for the Chicago Tribune. Her column appears in 150 newspapers across the country.

I think the best advice is simply good advice.

It's helpful, useful and delivered with respect.

Ask Beth's specialty was advising young people about relationships, sexuality, and sexual behavior. This is a tricky business because kids and teens are often misinformed — or simply uninformed.

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