All Things Considered

Monday through Friday, 3pm - 7pm; Saturday and Sunday, 4pm - 5pm
  • Hosted by Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish
  • Local Host Guy Stephens

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world.  Every weekday afternoon, hosts Robert Siegel, Melissa Block, and Audie Cornish bring listeners breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.  WNIJ airs a one-hour edition of the program at 4pm on Saturday and Sunday.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

We're going to spend some time now with writer Katherine Heiny. That profession is not something her family expected and, she says, in some ways, neither did she.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This weekend, visitors to the Detroit Institute of Arts buzzed with excitement over a new exhibit — it was a big moment for the once-troubled museum. The DIA spent much of the last two years under threat as its owner, the city of Detroit, looked for ways to emerge from bankruptcy.

Finally, in November, a "grand bargain" was struck. Foundations, private donors and the state of Michigan together raised more than $800 million to help rescue public employee pensions. In return, ownership of the DIA was transferred to a trust — thereby securing its future.

A new understanding of the brain's cerebellum could lead to new treatments for people with problems caused by some strokes, autism and even schizophrenia.

That's because there's growing evidence that symptoms ranging from difficulty with abstract thinking to emotional instability to psychosis all have links to the cerebellum, says Jeremy Schmahmann, a professor of neurology at Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital.

Over the weekend, the Venezuelan national assembly granted President Nicolas Maduro emergency powers. The U.S. recently imposed sanctions against some of Maduro's party leaders. With falling oil prices, the economy is in tatters, and the Wall Street Journal's Kejal Vyas says the rule by decree could result in a crackdown on dissent.

The two likely Republican presidential front-runners, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, visited New Hampshire this weekend. Though neither has officially declared their candidacy, The Boston Globe's James Pindell says they're giving political reporters a lot to talk about.

Book Review: 'Sailing The Forest'

Mar 16, 2015
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

As winter takes a final bow, our reviewer Tess Taylor wants to recommend a book of poems that's carried her through this season. It's called "Sailing The Forest" by Scottish poet Robin Robertson.

Earlier this week, Wikimedia, the parent company of Wikipedia, filed a lawsuit against the National Security Agency, saying that the NSA's use of "upstream" mass surveillance violates the First and Fourth Amendments.

In murder mystery novels, when the hero, a private detective or homicide cop, drops by a late-night Alcoholics Anonymous meeting to stave off a sudden craving for a beer or two or 20, it's usually in some dingy church basement or dilapidated storefront on the seedier side of town. There's a pot of burnt coffee and a few stale doughnuts on a back table.

The Center for Students in Recovery at the University of Texas could not be more different.

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