Fresh Air

Monday through Thursday, 2pm - 3pm

Fresh Air opens the window on contemporary arts and issues with guests from worlds as diverse as literature and economics.  Terry Gross hosts this multi-award-winning daily interview and features program.  The veteran public radio interviewer is known for her extraordinary ability to engage guests of all dispositions.  Each Monday through Thursday, she delights intelligent and curious listeners with revelations on contemporary societal concerns.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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When Amy Winehouse, the British musician who sang memorably about her refusal to go to rehab, died due to problems related to drugs, alcohol and bulimia in July 2011, she was nearly as famous for her personal struggles as she was for her music. Just 27, Winehouse had been tabloid fodder for years.

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Is there such a thing as a "gay voice"? For gay filmmaker David Thorpe, the answer to that question is complicated. "There is no such thing as a fundamentally gay voice," Thorpe tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. But, he adds, "there is a stereotype and there are men, to a greater or lesser extent, who embody that stereotype."

In his new film, Do I Sound Gay?, Thorpe searches for the origin of that stereotype and documents his own attempts to sound "less gay" by working with speech pathologist Susan Sankin.

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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