Here and Now

Monday through Friday, Noon - 2pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
  • Local Host Jenna Dooley

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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'Pharma Bro' Martin Shkreli's Trial Begins

22 hours ago

Former pharmaceutical CEO Martin Shkreli goes on trial starting Monday for federal securities fraud. Shkreli, who became known as “pharma bro,” came under widespread criticism for upping the price of the lifesaving drug Daraprim 5,000 percent. He is going on trial for something unrelated — prosecutors say that he operated a Ponzi-like scheme at two companies he ran.

This week, President Trump will combine his three roles — president, businessman and politician — into one event at the Trump Hotel in Washington. At an expensive fundraiser for his 2020 re-election, he not only will rake in cash for his campaign, but also run up a huge pile of revenues for his business. His latest financial disclosure suggests that it is lucrative for him to spend time at his own properties.

The U.S. took in more than 96,000 refugees last year, and many were children. Some of those children are finishing their first year in American schools.

Diane Orson from Here & Now contributor WNPR reports on an after-school arts program that’s partnered with a local resettlement agency to create a special violin class for some of the 270 young refugees living in New Haven, Connecticut.

A Slow And Steady Approach To Chemotherapy

Jun 22, 2017

When doctors treat cancer with chemotherapy, they usually attack the tumor as aggressively as the patient can bear. Then, after a break, they do it again. And again.

But that hard-hitting chemo tactic can have a downside: a few resistant cancer cells may survive, and the cancer can come back.

The shipping containers that come through the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach every year would wrap around the Earth two times if you laid them out end-to-end. Those containers are filled with electronics and clothing that are manufactured in places like Asia and then shipped to U.S. retailers.

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