Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

Today the California State Senate will take up an emergency $1.1 billion water management bill. That legislation has the support of the governor and the leaders of both political parties, and is expected to pass easily.

Giving Up The Concert Stage To Teach

22 hours ago

Seymour Bernstein fell in love with the piano at an early age and built a stellar concert career. But when he was 50, Seymour decided to give it up to devote his time to writing and teaching.

Now 88, Seymour Bernstein is the focus of the documentary “Seymour: An Introduction,” directed by actor Ethan Hawke. Here & Now’s Robin Young talks to Bernstein about his life and the film.

A new report released today by the Department of Homeland Security, says the number of international students being accepted by American universities is at an all-time high of 1.13 million. The number accepted is up 14 percent from last year, and nearly 50 percent from 2010.

James Corden is the new face of CBS's “The Late Late Show.”

Corden is virtually unknown in the U.S., aside from those of who know him as the baker in Disney's screen adaptation of "Into The Woods."

NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans stayed up late, late last night to watch Corden's first show and now shares his impressions with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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Guest

Has your car ever broken down the day after you bought it? Are your flights constantly delayed and overbooked? Did your barber give you the wrong haircut for your wedding day?

You might need the help of the man who’s been called “Britain’s Greatest Complainer.”

Jasper Griegson is a complaint expert and wrote over 5,000 complaint letters on behalf of readers of the British newspaper, The Daily Express.

Americans' Love Of Diet Soda Fizzing Out

Mar 24, 2015

New data from the market research firm Euromonitor finds that sales of low calorie soft drinks in the United States fell almost 20 percent over the last five years.

By 2019, sales are projected to fall off by a third since their peak in 2009. Diet Coke has seen its sales fall off by 15 percent in the past two years.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson looks at what’s happening in the soda business with Jason Bellini of the Wall Street Journal.

U.S. Skaters Aim For Gold At Worlds

Mar 23, 2015

The World Figure Skating Championships begin this week in Shanghai, China.

American skaters like Ashley Wagner, Gracie Gold, Polina Edmunds, Jason Brown and Josh Farris may stand a chance at getting on the podium, but they are not favored to win gold.

It’s been eight seasons since an American woman won a singles medal at the world or Olympic level, and four for the men.

It’s that time of year: the high school class of 2015 is now receiving college decision letters.

At the same time, current high school freshmen and sophomores will face a revised version of the preliminary SAT or PSAT in the fall of 2015.

The PSAT is an important step before taking the actual SAT but the announced changes may change the way students go about preparing.

China’s top weather official is warning people about the potential impact of climate change.

China’s Xinhua news agency reports that Zheng Guoguang, chief of China’s Meteorological Administration, said climate change could reduce crop yields and lead to “ecological degradation.”

The statements are considered rare, even though China is the world’s largest source of carbon dioxide emissions.

“As the world warms, risks of climate change and climate disasters to China could become more grave,” Zheng said.

There are more than 300 specialty plates in Texas, paying tribute to things like wild turkeys, Dr. Pepper and the fight against terrorism.

But when one group submitted a plate design with their logo — a Confederate flag — it was rejected by Texas officials. On Monday, the constitutionality of that rejection will be considered by the Supreme Court.

At issue is whether the license plates constitute government speech or an individual’s private speech.

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