Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
  • Local Host Jenna Dooley

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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Republican Presidential hopeful Donald Trump was on the campaign trail again last night, stopping in Jackson, Mississippi to rally supporters.

In his speech, he reiterated many of his economic and national security plans, and tailored many of his comments towards African-American and Hispanic voters.

Trump was also joined on stage by former U.K. Independence Party leader Nigel Farage, who was instrumental in pushing through the Brexit vote for Britain to leave the European Union.

Last month, Here & Now spoke with a U.S. Air Force captain departing for Mongolia to compete in the world’s longest and toughest horse race. The Mongol Derby spans more than 600 miles and takes about 10 days.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti checks in with Capt. Tim Finley to see how he did.

Italian Premier Matteo Renzi says the death toll from the quake that hit central Italy has risen.

Renzi spoke Wednesday evening in the provincial capital of Rieti after visiting rescue crews and survivors in the hard-hit town of Amatrice and flying over other demolished towns in nearby Le Marche region.

Scientists announced the discovery of a habitable planet Wednesday, orbiting the solar system’s nearest neighboring sun Proxima Centauri.

Rumors of the finding circulated for several days and were confirmed by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), which added more details in a press conference.

Kelly Beatty of Sky & Telescope talks about the planet with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson.

When companies know about problems, they’re often reluctant to admit them publicly.

But it’s better when they do, because when the media exposes their problems, the negative publicity can do lasting damage. Recent examples include Volkswagen and Theranos.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti hears more from Curt Nickisch, senior editor at Harvard Business Review.

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