Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
  • Local Host Jenna Dooley

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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Keeping The Navajo Language Relevant

May 2, 2016

As the largest tribe in the country, more Navajos speak their mother tongue than any other indigenous language in the U.S. But the Navajo language is still considered endangered. Each year, fewer Navajo children speak it. Laurel Morales from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports that there’s a new effort to not only preserve the language, but to revive it.

Listen to more of KJZZ’s coverage of the Navajo language here.

In an era where big sports titles most often go to the wealthiest teams, England’s modest Leicester City Foxes are defying the odds. Specifically 5,000-1 odds. The team that Sports Illustrated calls, “arguably the wildest underdog story in the history of professional sports,” is just one game away from being crowned champions of the English Premier League. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Grant Wahl of Sports Illustrated’s Planet Fútbol about what makes the Foxes such unlikely champions, and what needs to happen to make that dream a reality.

Femi Oke of Al Jazeera English joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss stories currently getting traction on social media.

As the Republican nominating contest turns into a race for delegates and not just votes, some might ask why we even have delegates. Shouldn’t a popular vote suffice? Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Richard Pacelle, professor of political science at the University of Tennessee, to find some answers.

The crew of the Air Force warplane that destroyed a hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan last year did not have access to the “no-strike list” that specifically forbade targeting it, a Pentagon report says today. But the Pentagon says that lapse and the airstrike that killed more than 40 people at the Doctors Without Borders hospital was “caused by a combination of human errors” – not by deliberate action. That’s why US officials say the strike is not a “war crime,” as Doctors Without Borders and other critics have charged.

The odds of making a full recovery following a stroke aren’t great. Nearly half of all people who survive end up either needing permanent assistance to perform basic functions, or wind up in a nursing home.

Physical rehabilitation exercises post-stroke can help people recover use of a damaged limb, but there’s a growing belief that the typical exercises and routines aren’t providing enough repetitions.

From Capitol Hill To The Silver Screen

Apr 28, 2016

In the new film “The Congressman,” actor Treat Williams plays Charlie Winship, a Vietnam-era veteran turned U.S. congressman. The plot is based on the real life of Robert Mrazek, who represented Long Island, New York, from 1983 to 1993. But, as he tells Here & Now’s Robin Young, he always wanted to be a filmmaker.

The Commerce Department reported today that the U.S. economy grew at its slowest quarterly rate in two years, with the GDP expanding just 0.5 percent. Consumers are cutting back on spending, and businesses on investments, as Rana Foroohar of Time Magazine explains to Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Six people have been diagnosed with measles in the Memphis area in less than a week. That’s more cases in just a few days than the entire country had seen so far in 2016.

There are also several outbreaks of mumps right now, including at universities in Indiana, Ohio and Massachusetts. At Harvard University alone, at least 40 people have been diagnosed in the last couple of months.

DJ Sessions: Improvising In Harlem

Apr 27, 2016

When you think of musical improvisation, classical music probably does not come to mind. But WQXR classical music DJ Terrance McKnight tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that there’s a lot of it going on right now, particularly in the classical music coming out of Harlem.

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