Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson
  • Local Host Jenna Dooley

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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Tonight in Nevada presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will debate for the third and final time before the election on Nov. 8.

It will be the first debate since Trump announced that “the shackles have been taken off.” So it remains to be seen how he’ll respond to Clinton, who holds a clear lead in national and most battleground state polls.

Sibling Economics In A Recession

Oct 19, 2016

Economic mobility is critical to achieving the American dream, which centers on the hope that our children will be better off than we are.

To measure how the country is doing against that goal, experts typically look at how families do from one generation to the next. But what happens when there are class disparities among siblings?

Emiliano Villa from Here & Now contributor Youth Radio has the story.

Emily Núñez Cavness was a student at Middlebury College — and the only member of the campus ROTC — when she formed the idea for the company she started with her sister, called Sword & Plough.

Now an active military officer and CEO, Cavness works to reuse military surplus to create bags and other accessories. Veterans are a big part of the process, from design to sales to the models on the company’s website.

Fifty-two years after President Lyndon Johnson declared his “War on Poverty,” 20 percent of the country’s 74 million children live below the poverty line — many well below.

The recently released 2015 U.S. Census data show some improvement over 2014, but those gains don’t affect the children who live in the poorest households.

North Korea recently completed its fifth ballistic missile launch. It’s a move that defies growing international consensus that views the secretive, nuclear-armed nation as a grave threat to international order.

While it’s received relatively little attention in the U.S. presidential campaign, North Korea could be the next president’s thorniest foreign policy problem, according to some international relations experts.