Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Art Institute's Miniature Rooms Exhibit Comes Alive In Literature

Marianne Malone's "The Sixty-Eight Rooms" series was inspired by an exhibit at the Art Institute in Chicago. Pictured here is “Cape Cod Living Room, 1750-1850,” by Narcissa Niblack Thorne. Malone's most recent book, "The Pirate Coin," is set in 18th-century Cape Cod. (Art Institute of Chicago)

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 10:59 am

The Thorne Miniature Rooms are one of the Art Institute of Chicago’s most beloved exhibits: 68 miniature detailed representations of rooms that might have existed in Europe and America over some six centuries.

They inspired author Marianne Malone to write a series of children’s books aptly named “The Sixty-Eight Rooms.” The latest in the series, “The Pirate’s Coin,” is released in paperback today.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Anthropologist: Gang Violence Caused By Mental Illness

Anthropologist James Diego Vigil calls the violent, "crazy" behavior of gang members "locura," and suggests it may be a form of mental illness. (Rubén Díaz/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 10:59 am

What causes gang violence?

James Diego Vigil, a professor emeritus of social ecology at the University of California, Irvine, uses the term “locura,” from the Spanish word loca (crazy) to describe what he calls the “quasi-controlled insanity” of gang members.

He joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to explain.

Interview Highlights: James Diego Vigil

On what pushes kids into gangs

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Does College Pledging Lead To Greater Happiness And Success?

The survey results go against the image of Greek life depicted in the 1978 movie "Animal House" with John Belushi.

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 10:59 am

Fraternities and sororities get a bad wrap for wild parties, hazing and binge drinking, but a new survey finds that those who pledge in college have the last laugh — or at least more laughs than others.

A survey of more than 30,000 university graduates found that for students who belonged to fraternities and sororities, life after college is happier and they tend to be more successful.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

A Father's Labor Of Love Sparks A Tradition And A Hit Song

Paul Monti started the event called Operation Flags for Vets to place flags on every grave at Massachusetts National Cemetery after his son was killed in Afghanistan in 2006. (Alex Ashlock/Here and Now)

 

The tradition of setting aside a day to honor the nation’s war dead started after the Civil War. It was called Decoration Day then and on the first one in 1868 people decorated the graves of the Union and Confederate dead at Arlington National Cemetery. Cemeteries across the country are decorated just like that today as we mark Memorial Day 2014.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

New Debate Over Piketty's Book On Economic Inequality

French economist Thomas Piketty, pictured here during a presentation at King's College in London on April 30, is drawing criticism and praise for his new book "Capitalism in the Twenty-First Century," in which he argues that capitalism leads to the concentration of wealth in the hands of those already rich. (Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images)

Economist Thomas Piketty is defending his book today, from charges that he got his math on rising inequality wrong.

Piketty’s nearly 600-page book, “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” has been the most hotly debated book this spring over its key conclusion: “The central contradiction of capitalism” is that it leads to the concentration of wealth in the hands of those already rich.

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NPR Story
1:49 pm
Mon May 26, 2014

In Arizona, Shipping Aluminum Cans Out-Of-State Is Big Business

Aluminum beverage cans on the tables are to be sorted and prepped to be shipped out of Arizona. (Alexandra Olgin/KJZZ News)

In a memorable episode of “Seinfeld,” Kramer and Newman fill up Newman’s mail truck with bottles and cans collected in New York and head for Michigan — where the return deposit is a nickel higher.

Well, unlike Michigan, Arizona doesn’t have a return deposit for containers — but that doesn’t mean its bottles and cans aren’t worth something, somewhere.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, KJZZ’s Alexandra Olgin reports.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Tom Rush's Rite Of Passage Song

This is the season of high school and college graduations, a time when many young people are planning to leave home. The bittersweet mood of that time is captured in “Child’s Song,” which Canadian singer-songwriter Murray McLauchlan wrote and folk and blues singer Tom Rush made famous.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Who Is In Your Thoughts On Memorial Day?

Let us know who you are remembering on our Facebook page or in the comments.

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NPR Story
2:26 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Washington Concertgoers Fill Nearby Hospital

The Gorge Amphitheater, a week before Sasquatch. When 25,000 people pack the Gorge, its population exceeds every other town in Grant County. (Jessica Robinson/Northwest News Network)

This weekend, rock and indie music fans from across the country make their annual pilgrimage to a corner of the Northwest’s farm country, for the annual Sasquatch Music Festival.

Over three days, 25,000 rollicking concertgoers turn the picturesque Gorge Amphitheater along the Columbia River in central Washington into the largest city in the county.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Thu May 22, 2014

Americans Are Working Less, So Why Are We So Stressed Out?

Americans are working less hours overall, but among the white-collar crowd, time spent working is at a high, while leisure is at a low. (Phil Whitehouse/Flickr)

The amount of hours worked in the U.S. is considerably less than it used to be. And we’re not alone — every other advanced economy around the world is working less, too. But single parents are working more, as are the highly educated and wealthy.

Derek Thompson of The Atlantic joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss some of the reasons why it seems like we all have less leisure time.

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