Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
2:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

The Impact Of Seeing Disaster Videos Over And Over

A screenshot from a video of the train derailment in Spain. (YouTube)

The train derailment in Spain is the latest in a series of disasters this year that have been caught on video and been played over and over again in the media.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

If Detroit Went Bankrupt, Why Is Philadelphia Paying?

An empty field north of Detroit's downtown, Oct. 24, 2012. (Carlos Osorio/AP)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 4:25 pm

When Detroit filed for bankruptcy last week, city comptrollers and treasurers around the country held their collective breaths. That’s because cities, it turns out, don’t file for bankruptcy in a vacuum.

Philadelphia is already feeling the effects of Detroit’s bankruptcy.

That city will pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in additional interest costs over the next 20 years because the interest rate on Philly’s new $197 million bond offering is going up a quarter percent.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

London Marks One-Year Anniversary Of The Olympics

Inside the London Olympic Stadium in April 2012. (jeffowenphotos/Wikimedia Commons)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 4:25 pm

A new poll shows two-thirds of UK residents believe the country got its money’s worth from the Olympics, even though the $13 billion cost was three times the original budget.

London is celebrating the one-year anniversary of the games this weekend with a big international track and field meet in the Olympic Stadium, featuring Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt.

The BBC’s Alex Capstick looks at the legacy of the London Olympics.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

New Music: From Parisian Blues To American Pop

The members of the Washington, D.C. band Misun. (Misun)

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 4:25 pm

KCRW’s DJ Travis Holcombe joins us regularly to play some of the music that’s been catching his ear.

Today, he brings us songs by French-born Don Cavalli, British band Temples, North Carolina singer-songwriter Jackson Scott and D.C. pop trio Misun.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

An Argument Against Standing Desks

(Pace McCulloch)

One office worker says he enjoys sitting and he’s tired of the “superior moral attitude” from the standers around him.

Writer Ben Crair told Here & Now he accepts the medical studies showing that sitting at your desk is bad for your health. His objection to standing is based on “the pure satisfaction I get from sitting,” he said.

He argues there are other solutions to the health problem of sitting too long.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

New Alzheimer's Research Could Lead To Treatments

Alexis McKenzie, right, executive director of The Methodist Home of the District of Columbia Forest Side, an Alzheimer's assisted-living facility, puts her hand on the arm of resident Catherine Peake, in Washington, Feb. 6, 2012. (Charles Dharapak/AP)

A new report in the journal Nature shows a significant step forward in figuring out what causes things to go wrong in the brain early on in Alzheimer’s disease.

The research could lead to new treatments.

More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is projected to triple by 2050. So there’s urgent demand for treatments — or even better, a cure — but so far, there has been little progress on that front.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

DREAMer Hopes For Full Citizenship

Renata Teodoro is pictured in the Here & Now studios. (Here & Now)

As a child, 25-year-old Renata Teodoro was brought to the U.S. from Brazil by her parents, who lived and worked in the Boston area until her father’s asylum application was denied and her mother was deported.

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Award-Winning Novel On Asian American Artists

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:55 pm

In “The Collective,” writer Don Lee tells the story of three Asian Americans who meet at college and eventually form an artists’ collective in Cambridge, Mass.

The novel is a meditation on friendship and what it means to be Asian and an artist in the United States.

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Story Update: A Victory In Fight To Overhaul Penn Station

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:55 pm

There’s an update on a story Here & Now brought you in May, about the fate of New York City’s Pennsylvania Station.

On Wednesday, the New York City Council voted to limit Madison Square Garden’s permit to 10 years. Right now, the Garden sits on top of Penn Station.

With this decision, the stadium will have to find another spot. That’s great news to a couple of activists who said Penn Station was in need of a serious overhaul.

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

Remembering Faye Hunter Of 'Let's Active'

Faye Hunter, the founding bassist of Let's Active. (Facebook)

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:55 pm

Everybody knows R.E.M. but there were so many other southern bands that played the sort of jangly guitar pop that the boys from Athens, Georgia, made famous.

One of my favorites was Let’s Active, formed by Mitch Easter, Sara Romweber and Faye Hunter in 1981.

Any band that can produce a song like “Every Dog Has His Day” is OK in my book.

Well, Faye Hunter, who played bass and sang in Let’s Active, died on July 21, apparently a suicide.

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