Here and Now

Monday through Friday, 11am - 1pm
Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

WNIJ's midday news magazine keeps you up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things ConsideredHere & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Denver School Gets Blind Students Into Chemistry

Quinita Thomas (left), who is blind, works with her partner in a Metro State University chemistry lab. (CPR)

Mixing chemicals in a high school lab is challenging enough. Imagine doing it if you were blind.

A group of visually impaired students from all over the country had that chance at Metro State University in Denver recently.

It’s part of an effort to get more blind people interested in science, technology and math — fields in which they are severely underrepresented in the workforce.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Jenny Brundin of Colorado Public Radio has more.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

New IVF Technique Raises Ethical Questions

Connor Levy is the first baby born using a new in vitro fertilization technique. (Courtesy of Main Line Fertility)

A Philadelphia baby, born in May, is the first child in the world conceived using a new in vitro fertilization (IVF) technique, which screens embryos for chromosomal disorders and abnormalities before implantation.

People who use this technique will avoid implanting chromosomally abnormal embryos that would result in either not becoming pregnant, or in miscarriage.

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NPR Story
3:10 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Deadline Looms For States To Enroll Thousands In Health Plans

By October 1, states are supposed to have their health insurance exchanges up and running so they can enroll residents.

The exchanges are online insurance marketplaces for individuals and small businesses — where people can shop for a health plan.

Some people will pay out of pocket for their health coverage and others may get some help from the federal government to pay for their premiums.

Polls show that 40 percent of Americans do not know that the Affordable Care Act is in effect, and that percentage is higher for uninsured populations.

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NPR Story
2:32 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

State Department Urges U.S. Citizens To Leave Yemen

Police stop cars at a checkpoint near the U.S. embassy in Sanaa, Yemen. The State Department today ordered non-essential personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Yemen to leave the country. (Hani Mohammed/AP)

The State Department is urging all U.S. citizens to leave Yemen today citing “continued potential for terrorist attacks” and an “extremely high” security threat level.

The department has ordered its non-essential personnel at the U.S. Embassy in Yemen to leave the country.

This follows days of embassy lockdowns across the Middle East and Africa.

This morning, the U.S. Air Force transported State Department personnel out of Yemen’s capital, leaving only the most essential employees on the ground to monitor the security situation there.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion Make Music Onstage And Off

Johnny Irion and Sarah Lee Guthrie. (Joanna Chattman)

Sarah Lee Guthrie grew up in a musical household — she’s the daughter of Arlo Guthrie and the granddaughter of Woody.

But as she tells Here & Now, growing up, music was something she avoided. With musicians coming in and out and staying for weeks, “I always felt like we were the Addams family, we were so weird!”

Then she met musician Johnny Irion. The two fell in love and began playing together, as well as well as marrying and having a family.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

One Scientist's Quest: Improving The Flavor Of Commercial Tomatoes

Professor Harry Klee. (Tyler Jones/University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences)

Grocery store tomatoes are bred for yield and firmness, not for flavor.

And even though taste is relative, researchers at the University of Florida, Gainesville, believe they can come up with varieties of delicious tomatoes that will also appeal to commercial growers.

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NPR Story
2:01 pm
Tue August 6, 2013

George W. Bush Undergoes Heart Procedure

Former President George W. Bush is pictured July 10, 2013. (LM Otero/AP)

Former President George W. Bush underwent a successful heart procedure earlier today at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, to clear an blockage discovered yesterday during a routine physical.

The former president had a stent was inserted.

Cardiologist James Willerson, who is president and medical director of the Texas Heart Institute in Houston, joins us to explain the procedure, the symptoms of a blocked artery and what could have happened if doctors hadn’t discovered it.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Sounds Of Africa In St. Louis

Fred Onovwerosuoke founded the St. Louis African Chorus 20 years ago. (Courtesy of the artist)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:32 pm

As part of NPR’s Ecstatic Voices series, reporter Neda Ulaby visited the St. Louis choral group Sounds Of Africa.

The group explores the music of contemporary South African composers, including the African sacred music of composer Ikoli Harcourt Whyte.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

The Polyphonic Spree Makes A Joyful Noise

The Polyphonic Spree, a band based in Dallas, Texas, is on tour with the new album, "Yes, It's True." (Paul Kim/Flickr)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:32 pm

As he does every week, NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson recommends a new song for us.

This week he shares with us The Polyphonic Spree‘s new track “What Would You Do?” from their album “Yes, It’s True.

Thompson says the song is indicative of the bold, beautiful anthems that populate the album.

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NPR Story
2:02 pm
Mon August 5, 2013

Pirates Shift Focus From Somalia To West Africa

A crew of U.S. sailors and Nigerian special forces fighters engages in training exercise off the Nigerian coast in 2010. The U.S. Navy offered training to the Nigerian navy as worries mount of increasingly violent pirate attacks along the West African coast. (Jon Gambrell/AP)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 4:32 pm

West African leaders have called for the deployment of an international naval force to curb the growing threat of piracy off the Gulf of Guinea.

Piracy in the region needed to be tackled with “firmness,” Ivory Coast’s President Alassane Ouattara said at a meeting of regional leaders.

There are now more pirate attacks off West Africa than off Somalia, maritime groups said last week. Patrols by foreign warships are credited with reducing attacks by Somali pirates.

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