Arts

Deceptive Cadence
11:54 am
Tue August 14, 2012

Making A Case For Massenet, The Misunderstood Sentimentalist

French composer Jules Massenet died 100 years ago, leaving the opera world with a wealth of elegantly composed dramas.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 16, 2012 10:07 am

Poor Jules Massenet. How could the most successful French opera composer of his generation fall so far out of fashion? Perhaps the new 23-CD box set of Massenet's music, marking the 100th anniversary of his death (yesterday), holds some clues.

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Classics in Concert
10:40 am
Mon August 13, 2012

Yo-Yo Ma Headlines Tanglewood's 75th Anniversary Concert

Yo-Yo Ma offered a graciously warm performance of Tchaikovsky's Andante Cantabile for cello and strings with student musicians.
Hilary Scott courtesy of the Boston Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 10:24 am

PROGRAM:

  • Copland, Fanfare for the Common Man
  • Bernstein, Three Dances from On the Town
  • "Over the Rainbow," "Shall We Dance" and "Old Man River" (with James Taylor)
  • Tchaikovsky, Andante cantabile for cello and strings (with Yo-Yo Ma)
  • Sarasate, Carmen Fantasy (with Anne-Sophie Mutter)
  • Two movements from Haydn's Piano Concerto No. 11 in D Major (with Emanuel Ax)
  • Ravel, La valse
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Arts
7:12 am
Mon August 13, 2012

Rick's Picks: Cheap Trick guitarist's life on display in Rockford

Jacquilyn Stephens WNIJ
  • Extended version of our Morning Edition feature. Contains things you'll miss if you just read the transcript, including Nielsen interrupting another interview, his grandchildren interrupting his news conference, and a bit of his live performance with Miles Nielsen and the Rusted Hearts at the exhibit's opening.
  • Bonus: Miles Nielsen describes some of his favorite things from his father's exhibit at Burpee Museum, plus a sample of Rick Nielsen composing "Writing on the Wall" into a tape recorder at his kitchen table.
  • As aired on WNIJ

A new exhibit opened at the Burpee Museum of Natural History in Rockford this weekend. And this time, it isn’t dinosaur bones attracting huge crowds: it’s an eccentric musician and the things he has collected during his half-century in rock.

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Music Interviews
1:03 am
Sat August 11, 2012

Busking In Lansing, To Rave Reviews

Alexis Dawdy plays her violin on the streets of Lansing, Mich.
Scott Pohl WKAR

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 12:02 pm

All summer long, Weekend Edition has been sampling the sounds of America's street musicians. The latest to catch our ear is Alexis Dawdy, a young violinist who returned to her hometown of Lansing, Mich., to study at Michigan State University — and do a little busking on the side.

"I'm actually not a music major. This is really a hobby that accidentally became a profession," Dawdy says. "I'm studying linguistics, and I'm 17 credits out from graduation. My goal is to do it debt-free, and this helps a lot. This pays for books and this pays for food."

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Deceptive Cadence
11:24 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Fifty Shades Of Faure

Pablo Helguera

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:57 pm

Got an idea for a classical cartoon, or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

Deceptive Cadence
6:33 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Hamlisch At Juilliard, A Deal In Philly And Saving Ives

Marvin Hamlisch in a 1979 portrait.
Evening Standard Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 12:34 pm

  • Broadway and film legend Marvin Hamlisch died Monday in Los Angeles at age 68. Also the pops conductor for the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra and the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, he began studying at Juilliard at age 7 — and at the time, he was the youngest student to be accepted at there. "My big thing at Juilliard — because I hadn't taken that many piano lessons at that point — was not that I could play Bach or Beethoven, but that I could play 'Goodnight Irene' in any key," Hamlisch told NPR's Scott Simon in 1987.
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Favorite Sessions
3:36 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Leif Ove Andsnes: Fatherhood And Freedom At The Piano

Leif Ove Andsnes.
WGBH

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 9:48 am

Now that pianist Leif Ove Andsnes is in his 40s, he's told himself that it's time to "grow up" and immerse himself in Beethoven. This comes at the same time that he's immersing himself in the life of his daughter Sigrid, now 2.

For Andsnes, seeing the world through Beethoven's eyes is one thing, but seeing it through the eyes of a child is something else altogether.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:12 am
Thu August 9, 2012

You Are What You Hear: What Your Favorite Music Says About You

Why are your musical tastes a reflection of you?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:57 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
10:23 am
Wed August 8, 2012

Is There A Lawyer In The (Opera) House?

Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, opera fan.
MANDEL NGAN AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 12:35 pm

Opera: the stuff of passion, fury, sorrow and ... disquisitions on jurisprudence?

Maybe, if a panel discussion at the just-finished annual meeting of the American Bar Association is to be believed. Called "Arias of Law: The Rule of Law at Work in Opera and the Supreme Court," the session, which was created and moderated by Craig Martin of Jenner & Block LLP, featured U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg; Anthony Freud, general director of Chicago's Lyric Opera; and U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli Jr.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:13 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Magdalena Kozena's Labor of 'Love And Longing'

Mezzo-soprano Magdalena Kožená collaborated with a conductor she knows well, the Berlin Philharmonic's Simon Rattle — who's also her husband.
Mathias Bothor DG

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 11:18 am

One of the toughest tricks for a singer to pull off is putting a fresh face on each composer in a program. All too often, the Handel starts sounding like the Mozart, which in turn takes on too much of the Verdi and it all becomes indistinguishable.

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