Arts

Deceptive Cadence
8:57 am
Mon May 21, 2012

Come Sing In A Philip Glass World Premiere — In Times Square!

Composer Philip Glass.
Barron Claiborne courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 2:31 pm

Ever dream of participating in a world premiere of music by one of the world's most widely beloved and celebrated composers? Here's your big chance.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:04 pm
Fri May 18, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: May 18, 2012

Baritone Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau and pianist Gerald Moore in an undated recital rehearsal.
Erich Auerbach Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:51 am

  • This week has ended on a very sad note with the passing of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, who died earlier today in Bavaria at age 86.
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Deceptive Cadence
11:52 am
Fri May 18, 2012

It's A Marvel-ous Wagner Production

Pablo Helguera

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:47 pm

Got an idea for a classical cartoon, or a reaction to this one? Leave your thoughts in the comments section.

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist working with sculpture, drawing, photography and performance. You can see more of his work at Artworld Salon and on his own site.

Deceptive Cadence
10:56 am
Fri May 18, 2012

Remembering 'A Born God' Among Singers: Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau

A portrait of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau taken circa 1965.
Erich Auerbach Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:53 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
2:14 am
Fri May 18, 2012

150 Years Of 'Taps'

A lone bugler stands at attention in the rain at Wilmington National Cemetery in North Carolina, in 2009.
Logan Mock-Bunting Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 3:49 pm

This Saturday, 200 buglers will assemble at Arlington National Cemetery to begin playing "Taps," a call written 150 years ago this year.

Retired Air Force Master Sgt. Jari Villanueva, a bugle player, says he started out as a Boy Scout bugler at about age 12. He went on to study trumpet at the Peabody Conservatory before being accepted into the United States Air Force Band — where one of his duties over the next 23 years was to sound that call at Arlington National Cemetery.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:29 pm
Thu May 17, 2012

Can You Beat Out The 'Rite' Rhythm?

London cabbies beat out Stravinsky's time.
London Symphony Orchestra

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Deceptive Cadence
10:02 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Classical Music Is Supreme Today At The Nation's Highest Court

Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a dedicated advocate of classical music.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 1:52 pm

This is a big week for classical music at the Supreme Court. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg provided Alex Ross at The New Yorker with a list of her favorite records.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:19 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

Kathleen Ferrier: A Voice Not Forgotten

The English contralto Kathleen Ferrier had a voice like no other. She was born 100 years ago.
Decca

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 12:48 pm

One hundred years ago, a musical marvel was born. She grew up in a tiny hamlet in the North of England, but made a huge impression on the world of classical music.

"Unique" is an overused word, yet it truly fits the sound of Kathleen Ferrier's voice. If you've never heard it, prepare to be amazed — stop reading now and click on the link below.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:42 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Garth Knox: One Viola And 1,000 Years Of Musical History

On Garth Knox's new album, Saltarello, the adventurous violist creates surprising musical juxtapositions.
Dániel Vass ECM Records

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 6:49 pm

Garth Knox was born to play the viola. As a youngster, he already had two sisters who played violin and a brother who played cello. "So for the family string quartet," Knox says, "it was very clear from the start which instrument I would play."

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Tiny Desk Concerts
11:52 am
Mon May 14, 2012

Pedro Soler And Gaspar Claus: Tiny Desk Concert

Doriane Raiman NPR

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 12:32 pm

Music can be a beautiful conversation — rarely is that more evident than in this Tiny Desk Concert performance with the father-son duo of Pedro Soler and Gaspar Claus. Soler plays a delicate, intimate version of flamenco guitar, while his son turns the cello into an exquisitely expressive voice. Though 45 years separate them, pay attention to how they communicate. Music as a living language, and an invisible emotional exchange, is clearly apparent in these improvisational compositions.

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