Arts

Remembrances
4:52 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Roman Totenberg's Remarkable Life And Death

Totenberg teaches student Letitia Hom in his classroom at Boston University. Totenberg made his debut as a soloist with the Warsaw Philharmonic at age 11.
David L. Ryan The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 12:20 pm

My father, world-renowned virtuoso violinist and teacher Roman Totenberg, whose professional career spanned nine decades and four continents, died early Tuesday morning at the age of 101.

His death was as remarkable as his life. He made his debut as a soloist with the Warsaw Philharmonic at age 11, performed his last concert when he was in his mid-90s, and was still teaching, literally, on his deathbed. This week, as word flew around the musical world that he was in renal failure, former students flocked to his home in Newton, Mass., to see the beloved "maestro."

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Mountain Stage
2:04 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Van Dyke Parks On Mountain Stage

Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 1:50 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
12:11 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Classical Lost And Found: Danish Delights From The Late 19th Century

Horneman's music has a flair for the theatrical.
Dacapo Records

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 2:58 pm

Born into a well-to-do Danish family in 1840, Christian Frederik Emil Horneman showed musical talent at an early age, then went on to study in Leipzig and later spent most of his life as a teacher. But he would also compose a limited amount of music, which one wishes had been greater in quantity judging from the fine orchestral works on this new release.

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Deceptive Cadence
9:57 am
Mon May 7, 2012

'Wagner's Dream': Is It The Met's Nightmare?

Ken Howard Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 11:02 am

When it comes to reliable lightning rods in classical music, it's hard to top Richard Wagner. The latest controversies center on the Metropolitan Opera's current staging of the composer's gargantuan Ring cycle, the set of four epic and mythical operas first mounted at Bayreuth in 1876, and now seen live at the Met together in a series.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:41 pm
Sat May 5, 2012

Fireworks From Cuba, And Schubert That Grooves: New Classical Albums

The new album by The Knights, A Second of Silence, celebrates Schubert and more modern but like-minded composers.
Ancalagon Records

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 6:37 pm

Although it always seems fashionable to forecast the downfall of classical music, enterprising musicians both young and not so young continue to make deeply satisfying recordings. For this visit to weekends on All Things Considered, I was delighted to uncover the little known (at least in this country) Jorge Luis Prats, a terrifically talented Cuban pianist whose once uncertain career appears to be resurging — at 55, he has signed a handsome record deal. Then there's The Knights, a young chamber orchestra with a postmodern take on Schubert.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:37 am
Sat May 5, 2012

Elgar's Belated Symphony: Majestic, Noble And Perfectly British

British composer Edward Elgar, seated at his desk at Severn House in Hampstead. His Symphony No. 1 was hailed as the best British symphony ever when it debuted in 1908.
Reginald Haines Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 9:26 am

When Edward Elgar unveiled his first symphony in 1908, it was hailed as the greatest British symphony ever written. The London papers were ecstatic.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:24 pm
Fri May 4, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: May 4, 2012

Domingo Pl — er, Placido Domingo.
Sheila Rock courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat May 5, 2012 7:38 am

  • I'm not sure how the Daily Mail arrived at the unfortunate headline "An Unlikely Fan: Why Opera's Biggest Star, Domingo Placido Is Crazy For Lady Gaga." The obvious hed goof aside, it's not like Domingo gives La Gaga effusive praise: "I think Lady Gaga has a very good voice. Absolutely. She has a wonderful voice.
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Classics in Concert
5:10 pm
Thu May 3, 2012

Danielle De Niese In Concert

NPR

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 7:18 pm

At first blush, you might not think operas and nightclubs would be a natural pairing. But an evening at New York's (Le) Poisson Rouge with Danielle de Niese — the 33-year-old star soprano who calls herself a "diva for the digital age" — proved a blend of uptown music and downtown grit could be just right.

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Music
2:28 am
Wed May 2, 2012

Marcel Khalife: The Bob Dylan Of The Arab World

Marcel Khalife is a Middle Eastern musical and political icon.
Driss Ben Malek Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 7:03 am

The Lebanese classical musician and composer Marcel Khalife is often compared to Bob Dylan — not for his music, but for his politics. The Middle Eastern musical and political icon sings about freedom and nationalism.

Khalife is famous for translating poetry into music. For years, he collaborated with the nationalist Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish.

"It began when I graduated from the music conservatory in Beirut. The civil war started in Lebanon — I wanted to change the world with music," says Khalife.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:40 pm
Tue May 1, 2012

Meet Your New Piano Idol: Behzod Abduraimov

Behzod Abduraimov.
Benjamin Ealovega

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 6:03 pm

There's a new superstar pianist on the horizon: Behzod Abduraimov. Haven't heard of him yet? That's not surprising — at just 21, this native of Tashkent, Uzbekistan has kept a very low profile so far. He's spent the past five years in the U.S., but not at a big-name school like the Curtis Institute (like Lang Lang or Yuja Wang, for example) or at Juilliard, where he was accepted as a student. Instead, he went to study with Stanislav Ioudenitch Park University in Salt Lake City Parkville, Missouri, where he's still enrolled.

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