Arts

Deceptive Cadence
3:03 am
Sat May 12, 2012

Roman Totenberg: A Musical Life Remembered

At 101, Roman Totenberg was teaching students up to the very end of his life.
Suzanne Kreiter The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:54 pm

[Roman Totenberg was a child prodigy who became a violin virtuoso, as well as a master teacher who passed along his command of craft and his love of music — and life — to thousands. He was also the man you wanted to sit next to at the table because he was so funny. Totenberg died this week at the age of 101, surrounded by loving family, friends and students. We asked his daughter, Nina Totenberg, for this remembrance. — Scott Simon]

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Deceptive Cadence
1:58 pm
Fri May 11, 2012

Around The Classical Internet: May 11, 2012

courtesy of the Copenhagen Philharmonic

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 3:38 pm

News from around the world this week:

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Deceptive Cadence
11:03 am
Fri May 11, 2012

Gags Ordered: The Cartoon Caption Contest Winners

Pablo Helguera

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:55 pm

After 11 days and more than 500 submissions, we proudly unveil a winner (and several honorable mentions) in our very first classical cartoon caption contest. Congratulations to Gregory Curnow from central Massachusetts, who remembered that hippos not only excel at the violin, but also have a habit of snorting.

"I just tried to put myself in the shoes of a judge in one of those blind symphony orchestra auditions," Curnow said when asked how he came up with his winning caption. We'll send him a new NPR Music tote bag and coffee mug for his efforts.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:16 pm
Thu May 10, 2012

Van-tiques Roadshow: Compete For Cliburn's Collection At Christie's

Pianist Van Cliburn.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 7:13 am

On May 17th, the famous auction house Christie's will sell more than 150 items for pianist Van Cliburn. Now 77 years old, the Cold War-era classical music megastar and competition founder has long been a collector of fine English furniture, Russian art, silver and jewelry — and Christie's expects this New York sale to bring in more than $3 million.

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Deceptive Cadence
10:57 am
Wed May 9, 2012

Talk Like An Opera Geek: Pioneering An American Sound

John Adams' Nixon in China, produced at the Metropolitan Opera in January 2011. Left to right: Janis Kelly as Pat Nixon, Teresa S. Herold as the Second Secretary to Mao, James Maddalena as Richard Nixon, Ginger Costa Jackson as the First Secretary to Mao, Russell Braun as Chou En-lai.
Ken Howard Metropoltan Opera

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 12:27 pm

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Remembrances
4:52 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Roman Totenberg's Remarkable Life And Death

Totenberg teaches student Letitia Hom in his classroom at Boston University. Totenberg made his debut as a soloist with the Warsaw Philharmonic at age 11.
David L. Ryan The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 12:20 pm

My father, world-renowned virtuoso violinist and teacher Roman Totenberg, whose professional career spanned nine decades and four continents, died early Tuesday morning at the age of 101.

His death was as remarkable as his life. He made his debut as a soloist with the Warsaw Philharmonic at age 11, performed his last concert when he was in his mid-90s, and was still teaching, literally, on his deathbed. This week, as word flew around the musical world that he was in renal failure, former students flocked to his home in Newton, Mass., to see the beloved "maestro."

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Mountain Stage
2:04 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Van Dyke Parks On Mountain Stage

Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 1:50 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
12:11 pm
Tue May 8, 2012

Classical Lost And Found: Danish Delights From The Late 19th Century

Horneman's music has a flair for the theatrical.
Dacapo Records

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 2:58 pm

Born into a well-to-do Danish family in 1840, Christian Frederik Emil Horneman showed musical talent at an early age, then went on to study in Leipzig and later spent most of his life as a teacher. But he would also compose a limited amount of music, which one wishes had been greater in quantity judging from the fine orchestral works on this new release.

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Deceptive Cadence
9:57 am
Mon May 7, 2012

'Wagner's Dream': Is It The Met's Nightmare?

Ken Howard Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 11:02 am

When it comes to reliable lightning rods in classical music, it's hard to top Richard Wagner. The latest controversies center on the Metropolitan Opera's current staging of the composer's gargantuan Ring cycle, the set of four epic and mythical operas first mounted at Bayreuth in 1876, and now seen live at the Met together in a series.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:41 pm
Sat May 5, 2012

Fireworks From Cuba, And Schubert That Grooves: New Classical Albums

The new album by The Knights, A Second of Silence, celebrates Schubert and more modern but like-minded composers.
Ancalagon Records

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 6:37 pm

Although it always seems fashionable to forecast the downfall of classical music, enterprising musicians both young and not so young continue to make deeply satisfying recordings. For this visit to weekends on All Things Considered, I was delighted to uncover the little known (at least in this country) Jorge Luis Prats, a terrifically talented Cuban pianist whose once uncertain career appears to be resurging — at 55, he has signed a handsome record deal. Then there's The Knights, a young chamber orchestra with a postmodern take on Schubert.

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